About: Suzanne Blier and Frances Terpak

Suzanne Blier I'm Allen Whitehill Clowes Professor of Fine Arts and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University and a 2014 Getty Scholar. Frances Terpak I'm a curator at the Getty Research Institute. My areas of focus include early modern optical devices, and 19th-century photography in China, Algeria, Persia, and the Ottoman empire. - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/author/fterpak/#sthash.ziIk6Leh.dpuf

Posts by Suzanne Blier and Frances Terpak

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photographs of Africa from the Late 1800s

Women from Zanzibar, plate 40 / Edouard Foa
Women from Zanzibar, 1893, Edouard Foà. Albumen print in Views of Africa: Zanzibar et Côte-Quiloa-Dar es Salam-Tanga-Somalis, plate 40. Mount: 9 x 11 1/4 in. The Getty Research Institute, 93.R.114.1.2

Six albums by French explorer Edouard Foà reveal African society at the turn of the 20th century. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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