About: Suzanne Blier and Frances Terpak

Suzanne Blier I'm Allen Whitehill Clowes Professor of Fine Arts and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University and a 2014 Getty Scholar. Frances Terpak I'm a curator at the Getty Research Institute. My areas of focus include early modern optical devices, and 19th-century photography in China, Algeria, Persia, and the Ottoman empire. - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/author/fterpak/#sthash.ziIk6Leh.dpuf

Posts by Suzanne Blier and Frances Terpak

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photographs of Africa from the Late 1800s

Women from Zanzibar, plate 40 / Edouard Foa
Women from Zanzibar, 1893, Edouard Foà. Albumen print in Views of Africa: Zanzibar et Côte-Quiloa-Dar es Salam-Tanga-Somalis, plate 40. Mount: 9 x 11 1/4 in. The Getty Research Institute, 93.R.114.1.2

Six albums by French explorer Edouard Foà reveal African society at the turn of the 20th century. More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Shark Attack!

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This dynamic painting of a 1749 shark attack in Havana, Cuba, by John Singleton Copley was too good to paint only once. The original hangs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A second full-sized version of the painting, which Copley created for himself, was inherited by his son and eventually gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

      The third version (shown here) is slightly reduced in size, with a more vertical composition. It resides in the Detroit Institute of Arts.

      A quick peek into the digitized stock and sales books of art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute shows the sale of Copley’s masterpiece. It was entered under stock number A3531 in July 1946 and noted as being sold to the Gallery by Robert Lebel, a French writer and art expert. The Knoedler clerk also carefully records the dimensions of the painting—30 ¼ x 36 inches, unframed.

      On the right side of the sales page you’ll find the purchaser listed as none other than the Detroit Institute of Arts. The corresponding sales book page gives the address: Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich., still the location of the museum.

      Watson and the Shark, 1782, John Singleton Copley. Detroit Institute of Arts

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      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      02/10/16

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