About: Ruth Cuadra and Suzanne Michels

About Ruth Cuadra I'm an application systems analyst in the Information Systems department at the Getty Research Institute (GRI). I provide systems support and development for the GRI’s Provenance Index and other databases of art historical information. I'm also part of a team developing a new search engine that will improve online access to the GRI's resources. In May 2010 I received my master’s degree in Museum Studies from John Hopkins University, and I recently completed strategic foresight training through the California Association of Museums (CAM). I'm now serving as co-chair of CAM's newly formed Foresight Committee, created to research current trends, provide findings, and generate and facilitate discussion in order to define strategies for assuring more sustainable futures for California museums. About Suzanne Michels I'm a software developer and have been consulting with GRI Information Systems department since January 2011. I created the text-processing algorithms used to parse data from electronic renditions of WWII-era German auction catalogs. Currently I’m developing methods for automating the handling of bibliographic data for entry in the Getty Research Portal—an interesting and challenging endeavor! My prior work includes development of defense-industry system simulations and commercial software.

Posts by Ruth Cuadra and Suzanne

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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