2 Comments

  1. Jun
    Posted April 17, 2013 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    This is amazing! After having OCR’d countless german and dutch texts, I appreciate this so much. Will the software for recognizing and parsing out the sections be made open source at some point? I have noticed that Acrobat’s OCR technology is not as good as whatever Google Books uses, and that it has trouble with Serif scripts, mixing up the t’s and r’s, and the e’s and c’s.

    • Joe Shubitowski
      Posted April 18, 2013 at 10:26 am | Permalink

      Hi Jun,
      We have actually never discussed open sourcing the parsing code, but there is really no reason why we couldn’t. That said……the code is highly specific to the texts we are parsing so it is one of these “your mileage may vary” situation for being able to use the code effectively out of the box.

      I’ll talk with my development team about how we might package and document the code base to make it distributable.

      Best regards,
      Joe Shubitowski
      Head, Information Systems
      Getty Research Institute

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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