About: Patricia Harpring

I am the managing editor of the Getty Vocabulary Program, which compiles, edits, and publishes the three Getty vocabularies (AAT, TGN, ULAN, with the new CONA in development; see the Getty Vocabularies page). I do training and publish papers at various conferences around the country and abroad. My new book, Introduction to Controlled Vocabularies, is fast becoming a textbook in library schools. I have a PhD in Italian Renaissance art history; I have worked in the arenas of art standards and vocabularies at the Getty since 1985. This acquired knowledge of terms and trivia is helpful in the outside world too: I’m a respected opponent in Scrabble. More about Patricia Harpring: Career Profile: Patricia Harpring, Managing Editor of the Getty Vocabulary Program

Posts by Patricia

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

What Is 砂金石? The Art & Architecture Thesaurus Publishes Chinese Terms

Necklace with aventurine
Necklace featuring 砂金石 (shā jīn shí), also known as venturina and aventurien

The big news in the Getty Vocabulary Program is that around 3,150 records in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus with one or more Chinese-language equivalent terms, plus descriptive notes and bibliographic citations in Chinese, are now published online. The Art… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

An Update on the Earthquake in Chile

Earthquake damage at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Talca, Chile. Photo: Jorge Sacaan Riadi

The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) is a tool for cataloging and retrieving art information. It is being translated into several languages. Our friend and colleague Lina Nagel (manager of the AAT Spanish translation project) at the Centro de… More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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