About: Jessie Park

I’m a former graduate intern and current curatorial research consultant in the department of drawings at the Getty Museum. Drawings excite me because they reveal the movement of an artist’s hand through line and thus the process of artistic creation. I’m pursuing a PhD at the University of Arizona in Northern Renaissance art, with a particular research interest in cross-cultural exchange between Northern Europe and Italy in the Renaissance.

Posts by Jessie

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking East, Looking West

Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park
Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park

“Looking East” established a platform for international dialogue around art, history, and cultural exchange. More»

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      Banned Books Week—History Edition

      Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

      This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

      Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

      Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

      Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

      09/24/14

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