About: Sally McKay and Tracey Schuster

Sally McKay I'm head of Special Collections Services at the Getty Research Institute. I hold a BA in art history and a master's in library and information science. I'm keenly interested in the methodology of provenance research. Tracey Schuster I'm head of Permissions and Photo Archive Services at the Research Institute. I hold a BA in art history and a master's in library science. I have a strong interest in the military history of World War II and its impact on art and culture.

Posts by Sally McKay and Tracey Schuster

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

The Art of Search and Rescue

Dr. Frederick Pleasants at the Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Dr. Frederick Pleasants with the 40,000th picture recovered at the Central Collecting Point in Munich, where Nazi-looted artwork was assembled and redistributed after the war. Photo by Johannes Felbermeyer. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Rare documents and photographs in the Research Institute’s collections tell the real-life story of key Monuments Men (and Women). More»

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    • A List of Shameful Conditions & Operations

      To live alone.
      To arrive at a social gathering alone. (Desired by no one?)
      To go outside in clothing not suited to the weather.
      To say something that can be traced to someone else.
      To have nowhere to go Saturday night.
      To have no interest in Jacques Lacan.
      To have no friend with a summer cottage.
      To have no family.
      To be dirty, to smell.
      To have no interest in people.
      To be gossiped about.
      To be sexually betrayed.
      To be ignorant of current popular music.
      To be disloyal to a friend.
      To gossip.
      To grow fat.
      To become middle-aged.
      To lose one’s beauty.
      To be enraged.
      To be deserted by a husband or lover.
      To be inordinately ambitious.
      To have more money than your friends.
      To have less money than your friends.
      To be different from your neighbors.
      To not understand what is said to you. 
      To not recognize someone.
      To forget a name.
      To lose one’s powers.
      To go down in the world.
      To be bored with one’s friends.
      To be thought of as superior to what one knows oneself to be.
      To discover what one thought was common knowledge about oneself is not.
      To discover that closely guarded information about oneself is common knowledge.
      To have less knowledge than one’s students.

      Yvonne Rainer


      07/11/14

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