About: Tracey Schuster

I'm head of Permissions and Photo Archive Services at the Research Institute. I hold a BA in art history and a master's in library science. I have a strong interest in the military history of World War II and its impact on art and culture.

Posts by Tracey

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

77,000 Images of Tapestries and Italian Monuments Join the Open Content Program

Italian sculpture / Max Hutzel
Max Hutzel photographed Italy for 30 years, documenting architecture, paintings, frescoes, sculpture, manuscripts, metalwork and other "arte minore" (minor arts). The Getty Research Institute, 86.P.8

Photographs of Italian monuments and European tapestries join the Open Content Program. More»

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      PRUSSIAN BLUE

      It started as a mistake, transformed workflow for architects, and revived Japanese print-making.

      Created as a result of mixing blood, potash, and iron sulfate while trying to make red cochineal dye, Prussian blue was announced officially in 1710. 

      Paper covered with ammonium ferric citrate plunged into potassium ferricyanide turned Prussian blue and preserved the image of objects set on top of the paper in the process. And thus the “cyanotype” was born.

      From there, architects found these “blue prints” useful to make copies of one drawing. Sound familiar?

      More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art

      The Italian Comedians, about 1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.
      Equisetum sylvaticum, 1853, Anna Atkins; and Anne Dixon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      01/28/15

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