Art, Getty Foundation, Research

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Begins Today

An ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles comes together through new research, leading to exhibitions and events in 2017

Biscoito arte / Regina Silveira

Biscoito arte, 1976/1997, Regina Silveira. Photo: Gerson Zanini. Courtesy of the artist

Los Angeles is a Latin American city by virtue of history and geography. Launching with over 40 grants issued today, the initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA (Los Angeles/Latin America) proudly embraces and explores this identity, as manifest in a diverse range of artistic production.

A commitment to Los Angeles, its history, and the art made here inspired the Getty to launch Pacific Standard Time (first known as On the Record) over a decade ago. The exhibitions presented in 2011 and 2012—the result of nearly five years of original research supported by grants from the Getty Foundation—revealed the distinctive modernism that arose in Southern California.

With more than 40 catalogues, as well as exhibitions that continue to travel the world, this unprecedented undertaking did no less than rewrite art history. It also convinced us that Pacific Standard Time should not end there. We resolved to keep it alive, this time with a new focus.

The grants announced this morning will again fuel breakthrough exhibitions at dozens of Southern California institutions. Beginning today, this support will enable innovative research into Latin American and Latino artists, movements, and periods that in many cases are little known to U.S. audiences.

Purposefully diverse, research topics range from contemporary performance art to Afro-Brazilian modernism; from the luxury arts of pre-Columbian America to Latin American and Latino science fiction. Taken together, the exhibitions coming in 2017 will paint a completely new picture of the artistic connections between Los Angeles and Latin America. Using the collaborative approach that characterized the original effort, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will encompass dozens of organizations across Southern California in partnership with colleagues and institutions across Latin America. And exciting programs being planned now will expand the initiative beyond the visual arts to include music, performance, literature, and even cuisine.

The Getty is an international arts institution, with research and conservation projects all over the world. But the Getty is also of L.A. and for L.A., and it our great privilege to support the art of our region and work closely with our sister institutions here at home. I look forward to hearing your thoughts as “LA/LA” comes to fruition.

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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