ancient Greece

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Education, Getty Villa

Percy Jackson, The Hunger Games, and Why Your Kids Need to Know Classical Culture

A family visiting the Getty Villa explores ancient art, history, and mythology through frescoes from the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum.
Mosaic with boxers: A scene from the Aenied in which two boxers fight to a bloody end for the watching crowd. (The J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.AH.106)

The adventure and derring-do of ancient myth is an easy sell to kids, and parents too for that matter. But I believe your kids need to know more. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art

Grit, Money, Glory: Olympics Then and Now

Athletes and Competition (Gallery 211) at the Getty Villa

This weekend marked the start of the 2012 Olympics, a spectacle with 10,500 Olympic and 4,200 Paralympic athletes in competition across 26 sports, from handball to taekwondo to the good old-fashioned pentathlon. The Olympics we’re familiar with today are an… More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

What Did Ancient Music Sound Like?

Sarcophagus with Scenes of Bacchus / Roman

Ancient works of art illustrate that music had a strong presence in daily life of classical Greece and Rome. Vase paintings and sculptures in the antiquities collection offer an eye-opening view of the variety of musical instruments that were played, as… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa

Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Greece

Getty Villa docent Don Petersen reclines on his left side, elbow raised on a stack of pillows, with his right knee bent. He holds a skyphos, a common stemless drinking cup.

Elite Greeks and Romans reclined to dine, and ordinary people copied them when they could. Although the practice seems strange to us, it must have been both comfortable and convenient, since reclining during meals spread throughout the Mediterranean and survived… More»

Also tagged , , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Education

The Scent of Love: Ancient Perfumes

Frankincense tears, myrrh, stick cinnamon, and rose petals
Frankincense tears, myrrh, stick cinnamon, and rose petals

Make your own sexy scents inspired by the recipes of the ancients. More»

Also tagged , , 7 Responses
Posted in Antiquities, Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications

Unlocking the Secrets of an Ancient Fountain

“Mudmen” pose in front of Chambers I and II at Peirene, on or about July 6, 1909

Do you picture archaeological sites as dry, dusty piles of stones? Meet Peirene, an ancient Greek ruin so tantalizing that archaeologists have literally died for it. Dry and dusty this place is not. The story of the alluring ruin is… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, J. Paul Getty Trust

A Landmark Antiquities Agreement with Greece

Pavlos Yeroulanos, James Cuno, and David Bomford at the Getty Villa

This week, several of my colleagues and I had the pleasure of welcoming to the Getty Villa the Minister of Culture and Tourism for the Hellenic Republic, Pavlos Yeroulanos. The purpose of his visit was to join our President and… More»

Also tagged , , 1 Response
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Homer’s “Iliad,” Told in 135 Voices

Karol Wight, Guy Wheatley, Claire Lyons, and Jay Kurtz at the podium for the daylong reading of Homer's Iliad at the Getty Villa

It was an unusual day at the Villa. People wandered about with numbers clipped to their lapels. Intense conversations took place about Homer’s poetry, fueled by coffee and snacks. Visitors moved in and out of the auditorium, as if in… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Antiquities, Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research

Deciphering the Getty Hexameters

hexameters_workshop
Jens Daehner, associate curator of antiquities (left), and Sarah Morris, professor of classics and archaeology at UCLA (right), take a close look at the Getty Hexameters.

Scholars from as far away as England and Holland and as near as Westwood recently gathered at the Getty Villa to decipher and discuss an enigmatic ancient Greek text inscribed on a now-fragmentary lead tablet. These so-called “Getty Hexameters” date… More»

Also tagged , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Lasting War: Representing Troy in Ancient Greece and Medieval Europe

The Construction and Destruction of Troy, Orosius Master, Paris, 1405-6. In City of God (Cité de Dieu; original text in Latin); Saint Augustine, author; Raoul de Presles, translator. The Philip S. Collins Collection, gift of Mrs. Philip S. Collins in memory of her husband, 1945. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Ms. 1945.65.1, fol. 66v

For when one sees a story illustrated, whether of Troy or something else, he sees the actions of the worthy men that lived in those times, just as though they were present.    —Richard de Fournival, Bestiare d’amours, ca. 1250 The… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 7 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      gettypubs:

      Thanksgiving is almost upon us! Here is an ancient poultry recipe, in case your turkey recipe is looking a little less than exciting. 

      From The Classical Cookbook, a recipe for stuffed chicken from Apicius:

      Stuffed Chicken. Draw the chicken from the neck. Crush pepper lovage, ginger, chopped meat, boiled emmer; crush boiled brain, break eggs in, and work into a smooth mixture. Blend with fish sauce and add a little oil, whole peppercorns, plenty of pine kernels. Make up into a stuffing and stuff the chicken (or suckling pig), so that a little room is left. You can do the same with a capon. Cook, discarding the bones.  

      Wine cup with a rooster, attributed to the Tleson Painter, Greek, Athens about 540 BC, terracotta. 

      If you want boiled brain in your stuffing this Thanksgiving.

      11/25/14

  • Flickr