art history

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Man of La Belle Ferronière

Image 5_The London Illustrated_July 18 1931_1

A fake Leonardo? The scandalous court case of art dealer Joseph Duveen. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

Creating “Getty Scholars’ Workspace”: Lessons from the Digital Humanities Trenches

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Getty Scholars’ Workspace, an online collaborative working environment, is taking shape at the Getty Research Institute. Lessons from the pilot project. More»

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Posted in Art, Publications, Research, Voices

It’s Time to Rethink and Expand Art History for the Digital Age

Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"
But is it art history? Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"

We need a 21st-century rethink of art history, one that takes us beyond academia to include artistic creation and the reception of artworks by the public. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Publications, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Rethinking Art History

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In the digital age, is art history still relevant? The discussion is needed, and needed now. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Research

Six Questions for Art Detective Victoria Reed

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What does a provenance researcher do? And how does she do it? More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

What Makes an Artist Great? Curator Scott Schaefer on Vermeer

Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Johannes Vermeer as installed at the Getty Center
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

Johannes Vermeer is a beloved artist. Is he also a great one? More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Field Report from the Art History Olympics, the 33rd CIHA Congress

Program book and Anne Helmreich's attendee badge from the 2012 CIHA conference

Art history, like most other professions, relies on acronyms. CIHA refers to the International Committee for the History of Art, which is one of the oldest organizations in the profession, founded in 1930. I recently attended CIHA’s 33rd Congress in… More»

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Posted in Research

Why Have There Been No Great (Wikipedia Articles on) Women Artists?

Sign for an edit-a-thon at the Wikimedia Foundation in San Francisco reading Welcome Wikipedians: Mind the Gap

What’s the top hit when you google Louise Nevelson, Dorothea Lange, or Betye Saar? Wikipedia, of course. The online encyclopedia anyone can edit, Wikipedia features 22 million articles edited by 1 million+ volunteer editors in 285 languages. Of those editors,… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

What Is 砂金石? The Art & Architecture Thesaurus Publishes Chinese Terms

Necklace with aventurine
Necklace featuring 砂金石 (shā jīn shí), also known as venturina and aventurien

The big news in the Getty Vocabulary Program is that around 3,150 records in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus with one or more Chinese-language equivalent terms, plus descriptive notes and bibliographic citations in Chinese, are now published online. The Art… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Research Institute Launches New Search Interfaces for Library Catalog and Photo Study Collection

Research Library Catalog - screenshot of new interface launched February 2012

We’ve just made it easier to find research resources in the collection of the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute, one of the world’s largest art libraries. Last week, we launched a restyled and updated interface for the online… More»

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      From you have I been absent in the spring,
      When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
      Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
      That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
      Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
      Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
      Could make me any summer’s story tell,
      Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
      Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
      Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
      They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
      Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
      Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
      As with your shadow I with these did play.

      —William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564

      Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      04/23/14

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