arts education

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Actor Peter Weller Discusses Renaissance Florence (and Answers Your Questions!)

Peter Weller in Padua
Actor Peter Weller in Padua, Italy

Actor and director Peter Weller is known for his many film and television roles, most famously Robocop in Paul Verhoeven’s campy classic. However, Weller’s interests go far beyond the camera—he is a scholar of Italian Renaissance art who is completing… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Project Switch: A Small Game Experiment Yields Big Lessons

Switch is a new in-gallery mobile game at the Getty Center.
Switch game screen

Earlier this year, I worked on an experimental project to create a simple game that would be played in the galleries with a mobile phone (find the game here). The idea came from my colleague Rebecca Edwards (no relation), a… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Education, Getty Villa

Percy Jackson, The Hunger Games, and Why Your Kids Need to Know Classical Culture

A family visiting the Getty Villa explores ancient art, history, and mythology through frescoes from the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum.
Mosaic with boxers: A scene from the Aenied in which two boxers fight to a bloody end for the watching crowd. (The J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.AH.106)

The adventure and derring-do of ancient myth is an easy sell to kids, and parents too for that matter. But I believe your kids need to know more. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

18th-Century Art for the 21st-Century Classroom

Participants at the Getty Museum's Art and Language Arts alumni event - August 11, 2012

Students are often lectured at, asked to receive information and not question what is being said. As a college student, I’ve experienced this first-hand. This summer, I got to explore more creative approaches to learning as part of the team… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

From Getty Intern to Arts Professional: Museum Educator Jennifer Reid

Jennifer Reid at LACMA in 2012

In 2006, Jennifer Reid participated in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program with an internship in the Education department of the J. Paul Getty Museum. Fast-forward six years, and Jennifer is still working in museum education, but now at the… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Digital Display: Student Scavenger Hunt on View

The Digital Scavenger hunt photos on display in the Getty's Museum Entrance Hall

The Getty Museum is full of fabulous furniture, splendid sculpture, and of course, powerful paintings. What if you were asked to hunt for some of the most interesting details and objects in these works of art? Would you be able… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Philanthropy

From Getty Intern to Arts Professional: Art Historian Jessica Maxwell

Jessica Maxwell
Jessica Maxwell, an alumna of the Getty Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program, at Princeton University in 2012

In 2004, Jessica Maxwell participated in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program with an internship at the Getty Research Institute. She had such a great experience that she applied again the following summer, interning at the arts nonprofit LACE… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Horse, Of Course! Curator Anne Woollett on Equine Painting

The "Piebald" Horse,  Paulus Potter, Dutch, about 1650 - 1654, Oil on canvas, 19 1/2 x 17 11/16 in., The J. Paul Getty Museum
The "Piebald" Horse

Horses have been the subject of paintings, sculptures, drawings, and other renderings for thousands of years. They have been depicted as companions of man, within picturesque landscapes, and in dynamic races, chases, and battles. Anne Woollett, curator of paintings at… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Education Isn’t Just for Kids

Untitled life-drawing sketch / Paula Rucker

I’ve always appreciated art, but creating art never seemed like something I could do. Creating a drawing or painting was what talented people did, not me. Professionally, I first became involved in art 10 years ago when I left the… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Camera-Ready: Hooper Elementary Students on a Digital Scavenger Hunt

Students from Hooper Avenue Elementary School participate in a scavenger hunt at the Getty Center organized by John Divola

The Getty Center is one of the most-photographed landmarks in Los Angeles, with visitors snapping images of its art, architecture, gardens, and breathtaking views. In March, the Getty Museum’s education department chose to up the ante with a “Digital Scavenger… More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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