British art

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Life Before eBay: British Art Auctions at the End of the 18th Century

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A major new project traces the rise of the British art market in the late 1700s. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Anatomy of a Horse Painting

The Piebald Horse / Paulus Potter

In George Stubbs’s Brood Mares and Foals, which arrived at the Museum in October as a temporary anonymous loan, horses are sympathetically portrayed within the bucolic landscape of the English countryside. The overriding mood is idyllic, as a small coterie… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Marilyn Manson, Luminous Poetry, and British Watercolors

Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin
Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin, about 1800. Watercolor over pencil heightened with gum arabic, 14 3/4 x 19 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010.35

I never expected to witness an evening combining British artists Aubrey Beardsley and Thomas Girtin, goth-rocker Marilyn Manson, Ugly Betty, six contemporary American poets, Stonehenge, improvisational bassist Roberto Miranda, William Blake, and the exhumed body of a Pre-Raphaelite model. Yet… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Drawing That Once Hung in Thomas Jefferson’s Parlor

The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722
The Fright of Astyanax (Hector Bidding Farewell to Andromache), Benjamin West, 1797. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GG.722

An American has slipped his way into exclusive British company—the exhibition Luminous Paper: British Watercolors and Drawings, opening July 19. Owned for years by Thomas Jefferson, admirer of all things classical, this pen-and-ink by Pennsylvania-born artist Benjamin West depicts a… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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