digital humanities

Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship, technology

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Released as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Ellora Caves in India

Vast database of geographic places is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Scholarship, technology

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Scholarship, technology

New Report Visualizes Cultural History through “Big Data”

Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014
Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014

Using science to map art history. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Art & Architecture Thesaurus Now Available as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Vincent van Gogh's Irises

A key reference database on art and architecture is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship, technology

Beyond Digitization—New Possibilities in Digital Art History

Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul / Bernardo Daddi
Digital Daddis. In the Getty Center galleries with Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul, about 1330, Bernardo Daddi. Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 47 1/2 x 22 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 93.PB.16

Museums and libraries have digitized millions of works of art. Now what? More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship, technology

5,400 Images from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections Now Available as Open Content

Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu / Chinese
Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu (Kangxi-era lantern patterns), Chinese, 1790. Ink and watercolor, 29.7 x 24 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.M.25

Thousands more images, from Renaissance prints to early photographs, join the Open Content Program. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, Education, J. Paul Getty Trust, technology

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

The Getty announces its new Open Content Program

A new commitment to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship, technology

Publishing German Sales, A Look under the Hood of the Getty Provenance Index

gsc_featured

Incorporating Nazi-era sales catalogs into the Getty Provenance Index took a small team about two years. Here’s how they did the work. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust, Scholarship, technology

Risk, Collaborate, Tweet: Charting Next Steps in Digital Humanities at the Getty

digital_humanities_future_featured

What should we do to move forward in digital humanities? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Publications, Scholarship, technology

Which Way, Digital_Humanities?

Provocation from Digital_Humanities
A provocation.

“Ours is an era in which the humanities have the potential to play a vastly expanded creative role in public life.” Will they? More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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