food

Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa

Tea by the Sea, A Tribute to the Villa’s Past

View of the former Tea Room from what is now the Museum entrance

Tea by the Sea, a new experience of the ancient Mediterranean inspired by the herbs and fruits of the Getty Villa’s gardens, kicks off December 2. The idea of offering tours and tea at the Villa stemmed from the requests… More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center, Getty Villa

The Perfect Summer Picnic

Visitors sleeping on the lawn of the Getty Center's Central Garden

After a cool early summer, toasty picnic weather has finally arrived in L.A. The Getty is a great place for outdoor eats—this weekend, the Center is open Saturday and Sunday, and the Villa is open all three days, including Labor… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Cook Your Own Aztec Feast

Guacamole with a dash of lime
Guacamole with a dash of lime

Mexican cooking as we know and love it in the U.S.—moles, carne asada, burritos, cafe con leche, loads of melty cheese—would have been unrecognizable to the Aztecs. They didn’t have cows, pigs, sugar, cheese, butter, cinnamon, or wheat. They did,… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Eating with the Elite: A Culinary Tour of the Machine d’Argent

La Machine D'Argent, François-Thomas Germain, French, 1754

This spring the Museum is offering a feast of tours and courses about food in art. Nancy Real and Lilit Sadoyan, two gallery teachers, agreed to give me a taste. We went straight to the magnificent Machine d’argent by François-Thomas… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Picturing Food: A New Social Art?

Untitled from the series British Food, Martin Parr, 1995. © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos

Drop your fork! I need to take a picture! Perhaps you’ve heard this exclamation, followed by the snap of a camera, while dining at a restaurant or sitting down to a home-cooked meal. Maybe you have even said it yourself,… More»

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      Banned Books Week—History Edition

      Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

      This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

      Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

      Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

      Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

      09/24/14

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