food

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: A Sugar Sculpture in Technicolor

Detail of etching of sugar sculpture / Teyler after Lenardi

A fantastic episode from the history of edible propaganda. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Manuscripts and Digital Curation

Eat, Drink, and Be Merry virtual exhibition

From tasty to terrifying, three virtual exhibits explore the wealth of illuminated manuscripts. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Reconstructing Medieval Bread

Baking Bread / Unknown illuminator, Belgium
Baking Bread (detail) in a psalter by an unknown illuminator, Belgium, mid-1200s. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, each leaf 9 1/4 x 6 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 14, fol. 8v

A food historian sleuths the reality of medieval bread-baking. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books, Prints and Drawings

Dig In to the Art of Food at the Getty

Pastry Shop / Abraham Brosse
Pastry Shop, 1600, Abraham Brosse. Hand-colored etching and engraving, 26.9 x 34 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2014.PR.63

Exhibitions and events are extra tasty this fall. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

The Art of Sculpting with Sugar

Sugar sculptures of palm trees and nymph
Trionfi (sugar sculptures) of palm trees and nymphs, Arnold van Westerhout. Etching, 6 1⁄2 x 10 1⁄4 in. In John Michael Wright, An Account of His Excellence Roger Earl of Castlemaine’s Embassy: From His Sacred Majesty James the IId., King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, &c., to His Holiness Innocent XI (London: Printed by Tho. Snowden for the author, 1688), pl. 13. The Getty Research Institute, 83-B3076

In Early Modern Europe, sugar became its own art form. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty360, J. Paul Getty Museum

How to Eat Like a Renaissance Courtier

Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas
This istoriato plate bears the coat of arms of the Brescian Calini family and presents the myth of a musical contest between Apollo and the satyr Marsyas. Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas, mid-1520s, Nicola da Urbino. Tin-glazed earthenware, 2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.DE.117

What did the Renaissance Italians really eat? More»

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Posted in Art, Getty360, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Drink Like a Renaissance Prince

Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)
Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)

Wines good enough for a Renaissance prince. More»

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Posted in Getty360

Introducing Getty360

Getty360

Find exhibitions and events at a glance with Getty360, launched today. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chocolate, The Food of the Gods

chocolate-avocado cake with ganache

Eating chocolate, from Moctezuma to Marie-Antoinette. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books

600 Historic Recipes for Potions, Paints, and Pastes

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 2.27.34 PM

Vintage recipes for pretty much anything, for free! More»

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