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Posted in Publications, Research

New Virtual Library Offers over 250 Art Books for Free Download

45 years of art books for free - Getty Publications Virtual Library

From Cézanne to the silk road, Egypt to earthquakes, our new Virtual Library offers 250+ art titles for free. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Alfred Hitchcock Peepshow

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In Hitchcock’s Rear Window, voyeurism morphs into an inverted reflection of our own fears and desires. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Power of Poetry: 6 Questions for Amber Tamblyn

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“Poetry has the power to make you feel every human emotion all at once.” More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Dean of Canterbury Cathedral Offers Tales of Art and Creativity

The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury
The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

“Canterbury Cathedral tells the story of England across the centuries since the arrival of St. Augustine in 597—in glass and wood and stone, and in artifacts and music sung daily.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Adventures of Cricket and Flatfoot (aka The Okee Dokee Brothers)

ODB_Canoe_pic1

How’s this for a job: float down a river, then sing about it. The Okee Dokee Brothers reveal how they make it work. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

My First Concert Ever: Saturdays Off the 405 with Pickwick

Rosie Narasaki at Saturdays Off the 405 at the Getty Center
NOT photoshopped. Courtesy of ace-photographer (and Getty public programs coordinator) Jaclyn Kalkhurst

Really? Yes. 20-something intern Rosie Narasaki attends her first concert ever. And likes it. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research

The Monuments Men and the Race to Save Masterpieces, A Q&A with Robert Edsel

Robert Edsel
Robert Edsel

“What makes a man risk his life to save someone else’s life, much less a work of art?” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

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Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Actor Peter Weller Discusses Renaissance Florence (and Answers Your Questions!)

Peter Weller in Padua
Actor Peter Weller in Padua, Italy

Actor and director Peter Weller is known for his many film and television roles, most famously Robocop in Paul Verhoeven’s campy classic. However, Weller’s interests go far beyond the camera—he is a scholar of Italian Renaissance art who is completing… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Overpromise, Lie, and Other Questionable Political Advice from 64 B.C.

Portrait of Marcus Tullius Cicero with political campaign button

If Karl Rove had lived in ancient Rome, he might have written something like Commentariolum Petitiones, a down-and-dirty electioneering guide from 64 B.C. just published in English by Princeton University Press as How to Win an Election: An Ancient Guide for… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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