French art

Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Imagining the Culinary Past in France: Recipes for a Medieval Feast

The Performance of a Crusade Play at King Charles V's Feast (detail), Master of the Coronation of Charles VI, Paris, about 1375–80. From Great Chronicles of France (Grandes chroniques de France). Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris. Ms. fr. 2813, fol. 473v

In the French Middle Ages, as today, banquets were opportunities for the well-heeled to entertain guests in style. The set-up was simple: boards placed on trestles topped with white cloths, wine diluted with water in clay vessels, meats on five-day-old… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: Does Art Have to Be Serious?

Self-Portrait, Yawning, Joseph Ducreux, before 1783. Oil on canvas, 45 x 35 in.

Nowadays, seeing a silly picture of a person is hardly unusual. Showing personality is a good thing. Social customs weren’t quite the same in 18th-century France, when Joseph Ducreux painted this self-portrait. An official court painter, he was known for refined… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Objects and Memories: Edmund de Waal on Tracing a Family Collection

Albert Cahen d’Anvers, Pierre Auguste Renoir, 1881. The J. Paul Getty Museum. The portrait was sold by the Cahen d’Anvers family to a Swiss gallery in 1971.

When you visit a museum, it’s easy to forget that objects have a story, a journey from where they began to where they are now. Take Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s portrait of the composer Albert Cahen d’Anvers. It’s one of the most… More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

In Need of a Géricault “Fix”

Portrait Study for The Raft of the Medusa, Théodore Géricault, 1818–19

Even though it’s been more than a decade, I remember it as though it were yesterday. Like so many art history students, I made my first pilgrimage to the Louvre—tantamount to mecca for an art nerd like me—to feast my… More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

Jacques-Louis David, Political Artist

Suzanne Le Peletier de Saint-Fargeau, Jacques-Louis David, 1804

Today is  the 262nd birthday of Jacques-Louis David, the French painter best known for his austere Neoclassical paintings such as Oath of the Horatii. David was as political an artist as ever lived. He was a leader of the French… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down? Looking at Gérôme’s “Pollice Verso”

Pollice Verso: Detail of vestal virgins in the stands / Gerome

Visitors are captivated by The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme.  I met a couple from Miami who were so intrigued by a review of the exhibition in The Art Newspaper that they decided to fly to L.A. to see it. … More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The Rise and Fall of Charles Le Brun: Q&A with Louis Marchesano

louis_marchesano_2

I talked to Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the exhibition Printing the Grand Manner: Charles Le Brun and Monumental Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, now on view at the GRI—how… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Royal Propaganda, from Prints to Pixels

Queens of Persia at the Feet of Alexander (detail), Gérard Edelink after Charles Le Brun, ca. 1675

Spin control—it’s been around for centuries. Louis XIV, king of France from 1660 to 1715, was a master at it, using art—especially the work of his court painter, Charles Le Brun—to create and perpetuate a glorified image of his monarchy…. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Eating with the Elite: A Culinary Tour of the Machine d’Argent

La Machine D'Argent, François-Thomas Germain, French, 1754

This spring the Museum is offering a feast of tours and courses about food in art. Nancy Real and Lilit Sadoyan, two gallery teachers, agreed to give me a taste. We went straight to the magnificent Machine d’argent by François-Thomas… More»

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      Dressed in the finest 17th century fashions, a woman personifying September shops the local market.

      This sketch of September, the rich landscape, and bountiful harvest were made for paintings of the months for Elector Maximilian I of Bavaria for a dining hall in his Munich palace.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume in the Getty collection.

      Personification of September, about 1644, Joachim von Sandrart. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/19/14

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