Halloween

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Delightfully Horrifying Manuscript Illuminations

Halloween5

Selections from the collection for Halloween. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Boo! Don’t Look Now, But I See a Ghost

Mrs. Chapin oil merchant & his spirit wife & babe recognized / William H. Mumler

In the 1860s, an era fascinated with spiritualism—spirits, the supernatural, messages from the Great Beyond—a small-time engraver named William Mumler realized he could apply the latest technology of his day, photography, to create “spirit photographs.” Almost a visual séance, Mumler’s… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

A Devilish Artwork for Halloween

Saint Anthony with demons in Polyptych with Coronation of the Virgin and Saints / Cenni di Francesco di Ser Cenni
Saint Anthony with demons in Polyptych with Coronation of the Virgin and Saints by Cenni di Francesco di Ser Cenni, about 1390s. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.PB.31

Here’s an artwork from our collection that makes me squeal…with terror! The multicolored demons attacking my pal Saint Anthony are hooves down the scariest creatures around. The blue devil is a total gangster. He bullied his way onto our new… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Get the Scoop on Spooky Art for Halloween

She'll turn you to stone: Medusa, Vincenzo Gemito, parcel-gilt silver, 1911

What’s spookier than a terrible monster with snakes growing out of her head who can turn you to stone with just one look? Maybe it’s an invisible ghost who returns from the dead to haunt his wife. Or a sea… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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