Harald Szeemann

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Bringing Order to Harald Szeemann’s Unfiled Posters

Three posters from the Harald Szeemann archive
Three posters from Szeemann’s projects: 12 Environments (1968), signed by Christo; Documenta 5 (1972), designed by Edward Ruscha; and The Tendency towards the Gesamtkunstwerk (1983), designed by Markus Raetz. The Getty Research Institute, 2011.M.30

How do you organize and catalog 1,200 posters? More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: The Business Files of Harald Szeemann

Wine box used by Harald Szeemann to file his business papers
Szeemann's handy filing system: wine boxes. Here, Merlot + Marrakech.

Wine, meticulous receipts, and reimagined police tape in the curator’s files. More»

Also tagged , , , : | 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Alphabet Szoup

H is for Haring
H is for Haring

A look inside the artist files of legendary curator Harald Szeemann. More»

Also tagged , , , : | Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Treasures from the Vault: Harald Szeemann, From Vision to Nail

Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972 / Balthasar Burkhard
Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972. Photo by Balthasar Burkhard. The Getty Research Institute, Harald Szeemann papers, 1892–2010

A five-person team at the Research Institute has finished cataloging Harald Szeemann’s monumental Project Files. More»

Also tagged , , , , : | Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Preserving the Legacy of Harald Szeemann

Artists' files in the Szeemann archive

The Harald Szeemann Archive and Library, one of the most important private research collections for modern and contemporary art in the world, is coming to the Getty Research Institute—and we couldn’t be more excited. Szeemann was the most influential curator… More»

Also tagged , , , , , : | 4 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

  • Flickr