Japanese art

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

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Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Van Gogh’s Irises / Haiku Verses from Readers / An Invitation

Birthday cake for Vincent van Gogh's birthday decorated with The Irises in icing

To celebrate Vincent van Gogh, who was born on this day in 1853, we’ve been inviting visitors to share their thoughts in haiku form. Please join us! Leave a comment here, tweet your poem with the hastag #arthaiku, or leave… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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