Louis XIV

Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Framing a Frames Exhibition

7

How to hang a frame. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Laying Louis XIV to Rest

Representation of the Place Where the Body of Louis XIV, King of France, Was Laid Out in the Church of Saint-Denis
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Qb-1 (1715). Photo credit: BnF

Why are there so few images of Louis XIV’s death? More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Six Meditations on Versailles

Bird's-Eye View of the Castle of Versailles, Its Gardens and Surroundings, as Seen from the Orangerie / Antoine Coquart
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Va-422-format 4. Photo credit: BnF

A 1712 print depicts the palace of Versailles as capital of politics and pleasure. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Sun King Illuminated: An Emblem Book for Louis XIV

Escutcheon with a Landscape / Jacques Bailly
Escutcheon with a Landscape (detail) from Emblems for Louis XIV, text in French and Latin by Charles Perrault, illuminations by Jacques Bailly, about 1663–68. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 11, leaf 5

Sleuthing the symbols of Louis XIV in the Getty Center galleries. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Louis XIV as Royal Spectator

Detail of Fireworks on the Grand Canal / Jean Lepautre
Detail of fireworks in Fifth Day: Fireworks on the Grand Canal

Louis XIV appears front-row center in two engravings celebrating his grand parties. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Height of Fashion

Portrait of Louis XIV / after Hyacinthe Rigaud

Louis XIV and the craze for high heels. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings

A 17th-Century Face-Off

Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre / Robert Nanteuil
Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, 1661. Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60

Masterpieces aren’t the only important objects in art history. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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