Louis XIV

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Height of Fashion

Portrait of Louis XIV / after Hyacinthe Rigaud

Louis XIV and the craze for high heels. More»

Also tagged , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings

A 17th-Century Face-Off

Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre / Robert Nanteuil
Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, 1661. Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60

Masterpieces aren’t the only important objects in art history. More»

Also tagged , , , 1 Response
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

For Print Collectors, Organizing Is an Art

Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV / Colin
Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV, ca. 1672, Jean Colin. Etching and engraving in Monumens de l’histoire de France, tome 66, an album of prints compiled by the print collector Jean-Louis Soulavie. The Getty Research Institute, 900247

How do you organize 123,400 prints? More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Glimpse into the Sun King’s Private World

Ivory writing table (detail)
Detail showing the ivory and painted horn

An unusual table once owned by Louis XIV offers a peek into a king’s private world. More»

Also tagged , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV, the Original King of Viral Media

Louis le Grand / Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud
Louis le Grand 1714–1715, Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2011.PR.13

The original tech-savvy celebrity. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Antiquities, Art, Paintings

#MusePose, February Edition

Tristan as King Louis XIV - MusePose

Are you a king? A goddess? SHOW IT. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

  • Flickr