Open Content Program

Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

Botanical Art Inspired by Renaissance Illuminations

Hoefnagel-Inspired illumination showing a fly and a fuchsia
Hoefnagel-Inspired #4 2014, Denise Walser-Kolar. Watercolor and gouache on calfskin vellum, 4 x 6 in. Courtesy of and © Denise Walser-Kolar

Botanical illuminations inspired by a rare Renaissance book. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Scholarship, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

77,000 Images of Tapestries and Italian Monuments Join the Open Content Program

Italian sculpture / Max Hutzel
Max Hutzel photographed Italy for 30 years, documenting architecture, paintings, frescoes, sculpture, manuscripts, metalwork and other "arte minore" (minor arts). The Getty Research Institute, 86.P.8

Photographs of Italian monuments and European tapestries join the Open Content Program. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

5,400 Images from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections Now Available as Open Content

Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu / Chinese
Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu (Kangxi-era lantern patterns), Chinese, 1790. Ink and watercolor, 29.7 x 24 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.M.25

Thousands more images, from Renaissance prints to early photographs, join the Open Content Program. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Trust

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

The Getty announces its new Open Content Program

A new commitment to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. More»

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      Studying anything at a museum gives me a peek into what might have gone through the minds of other creatives. Being with the art in person, I am able to capture so much more with my eyes than what I would from studying a photograph. The sensation you get when looking at a piece in real life is incomparable. I would recommend to any artist, if possible, studying real pieces up close before just diving into studying photos.

      —Artist @franklinlei, profiled for our #GettyInspired series today on the Iris

      Pages from Franklin’s notebook with sketches of Bernini’s Bust of Pope Paul V and Riccio’s Virgin and Child at the Getty Museum

      02/11/16

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