outdoor sculpture

Posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Conservation Up Close: Maillol’s “Torso of Dina”

Graduate intern Kellie Boss shines an examination light on Aristide Maillol's Torse de Dina
Grad intern Kellie Boss shines an examination light on Aristide Maillol's Torse de Dina

Museum conservators solve a mystery during the routine treatment of an outdoor sculpture More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Revitalizing Barbara Hepworth’s Figure for Landscape

Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.
Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.

A behind-the-scenes look at restoring Barbara Hepworth’s 1960 sculpture “Figure for Landscape.” More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Scholarship, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Conserving Barbara Hepworth’s “Figure for Landscape”

Figure for Landscape / Hepworth
Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze, 107 x 52 x 27 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness, Hepworth Estate

Barbara Hepworth’s bronze figure is conserved. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

In This Unusual Exhibition, Sculpture Is Best Viewed by Car

Tiger 1, 2001, Gwynn Murrill, Edition 1 of 6, Bronze, 39 x 54 x 27 inches. Courtesy of LA Louver, Venice CA
Tiger 1, 2001, Gwynn Murrill, Edition 1 of 6, Bronze, 39 x 54 x 27 inches. Courtesy of LA Louver, Venice CA

Art best viewed from behind the wheel? In Century City, cast bronzes of SoCal fauna create an outdoor, drive-by art gallery. A tour. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Conservation Comes Outdoors for Henry Moore’s “Bronze Form”

What's behind that tent? Henry Moore's Bronze Form is being conserved in situ at the Getty Center

What’s inside this tent? Henry Moore’s monumental sculpture Bronze Form 5/6—normally the first artwork visitors see when arriving at the Getty Center—is undergoing a conservation treatment behind a rather mysterious-looking safety screen. My colleagues and I will be working on… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa, People & Places, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Come Eye to Wild Eye with the Bronze Sculptures in the Getty Villa Gardens

Close-up of eyes on Chiurazzi bronze replica in the Atrium at the Getty Villa
Watching you? Inlaid eyes on a "Bust of a Young Woman" in the Atrium of the Getty Villa

Accompanying you as you wander the gardens at the Getty Villa are 44 beings in bronze—animals, gods, satyrs, troubled philosophers, athletic youths crouched for action, wild-eyed old men with scraggly beards. These are replicas of ancient Roman sculptures commissioned by… More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, technology

The Making of Charles Ray’s “Boy with Frog”

Boy with Frog (detail), Charles Ray (American, born 1953), 2009. Painted fiberglass, 96 1/16 x 29 1/2 x 41 5/16 in. Courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery

Peering up at a giant sculpture, I often wonder: How do artists construct such massive creations? Here’s a peek at the journey, from artist’s conception to the Getty Center’s doorstep, of the larger-than-life Boy with Frog, which was installed yesterday… More»

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      ancientpeoples:

      Gold snake bracelet, worn on the wrist

      Romano-Egyptian, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. 

      Source: The J. Paul Getty Museum

      In the Hellenistic period, gold made available by new territorial conquests flooded the Greek world. 

      Combined with social and economic changes that created a wealthy clientele with a taste for luxury, this availability led to an immense outpouring of gold jewelry to meet the demand.

      Here’s a closer view of the detailing of the cross-hatching.

      05/05/16

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