Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Living Artifact: “Trojan Women (after Euripides)” Premieres Tonight

Tonight at 8:00 p.m., the Getty Villa becomes a stage for the premiere of Trojan Women (after Euripides).

It’s the culmination of years of work and refinement, both for SITI Company (presenting the play) and for the team at the Getty Villa that has helped shape the production. “Being here is remarkable because of the passionate relationship that the curators, in particular, have to what we’re doing,” says Anne Bogart. “They care and they have an opinion and it ultimately, I am sure, will make what we are doing a much stronger artifact, a living artifact.”

In this third part of our video interview series (see parts one and two), Bogart, playwright Jocelyn Clarke, and SITI Company cast members Ellen Lauren and Leon Ingulsrud discuss what it’s like working in a museum setting. “We’re treating the theater and the museum as a site-specific place; we’re not building a fancy set. Lighting is huge in our production, because the way you light that building and the environment—and the brush, bushes, and everything—is an aesthetic event.”

They also discuss the impact Trojan Women has had over time, and will have on the audience today. If you’d like to join that audience, get tickets here; Saturday nights are sold out, but some tickets are still available for Thursday and Friday evening performances.

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      What unexpected thing have you learned by working at a museum?

      The more time you take with the art, the better. 

      The first time I saw a work by James Turrell, my eyes totally deceived me. I walked into the room (Acton, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art) and saw a gray rectangle “painting,” but I was baffled and could not figure it out—I got closer and closer until my face was pressed against the wall next to it, trying to figure out what it was. When my friend stuck her arm into the painting and revealed the illusion (a square cut into the wall and lit to look flat), my mind was blown! You got me so good, James.

      Also, always offer to take a family photo for the tourists!

      What do you wish you could tell all people about yourself, museums, or life? 

      Everyone is creative.

      Emily, Education Technologist at the Getty, July 24, 2014

      07/29/14

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