Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Living Artifact: “Trojan Women (after Euripides)” Premieres Tonight

Tonight at 8:00 p.m., the Getty Villa becomes a stage for the premiere of Trojan Women (after Euripides).

It’s the culmination of years of work and refinement, both for SITI Company (presenting the play) and for the team at the Getty Villa that has helped shape the production. “Being here is remarkable because of the passionate relationship that the curators, in particular, have to what we’re doing,” says Anne Bogart. “They care and they have an opinion and it ultimately, I am sure, will make what we are doing a much stronger artifact, a living artifact.”

In this third part of our video interview series (see parts one and two), Bogart, playwright Jocelyn Clarke, and SITI Company cast members Ellen Lauren and Leon Ingulsrud discuss what it’s like working in a museum setting. “We’re treating the theater and the museum as a site-specific place; we’re not building a fancy set. Lighting is huge in our production, because the way you light that building and the environment—and the brush, bushes, and everything—is an aesthetic event.”

They also discuss the impact Trojan Women has had over time, and will have on the audience today. If you’d like to join that audience, get tickets here; Saturday nights are sold out, but some tickets are still available for Thursday and Friday evening performances.

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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