Arts Summit

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Voices

A Vision of Possibilities

Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.
Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.

Every interaction is an opportunity. Thoughts on considering a career in the arts. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

New Perspectives: Exploring Career Paths at the 2013 Getty Intern Arts Summit

Hilary_Walters
Hilary Walter, Program Assistant at the Getty Foundation, catches up with interns at the end of a great day.

A glimpse into the world of professional development for the Getty’s Multicultural Summer Interns. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Expanding Identity: Reflections on the 2012 Getty Intern Arts Summit

Artist Kip Fulbeck speaking at the Getty Art Summit

This summer, I am working at the Getty Foundation as part of the Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program. The program provides paid internships to diverse students at arts organizations all across L.A., including the Getty. The highlight of my first week was assisting… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Exploring Multidimensional Practice at Arts Summit

Participants in the Getty Foundation's Multicultural Undergraduate Internship (MUI) program attend a session at the 2011 Arts Summit

On June 27, 119 students participating in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program came to the Getty Center for the program’s annual Arts Summit. Interns chose from discussion topics led by arts professionals who shared their personal experience and… More»

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      The Perfect Male Form?

      This bronze sculpture is a copy of an ancient Roman marble statue known as the Belvedere Antinous, long considered one of the most beautiful statues to survive from antiquity. Engravings of the statue were used as models in the study of perfect body proportions.

      The bronze was once owned by Louis XIV, who purchased bronze replicas of ancient sculptures to enhance his kingly magnificence.

      A Bronze God for the Sun King

      Belvedere Antinous, about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Plate 11 in Gérard Audran, Proportions of the human body, measured from the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, 1683. The Getty Research Institute

      07/05/15

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