cultural heritage

Posted in Ancient World, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Inside the Bulla Regia Model Field Project | Getty Voices

GCI consultant and project team member, Livia Alberti, working with conservation technician Mondher Habachi. Photo: Scott S. Warren
GCI consultant and project team member, Livia Alberti, working with conservation technician Mondher Habachi. Photo: Scott S. Warren

What does it take to preserve an entire ancient Roman structure? More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

India’s Vibrant Cultural Heritage Comes to Life at Nagaur Fort

Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art
Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art

A 20-year project Initiated by the Getty Foundation at the Historic Fort Has Lasting Effects Located in northwest India, a two hour drive from the fortress city of Jodhpur in Rajasthan lies the Nagaur-Ahhichatragarh Fort. Begun in the 12th century… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Architecture Critic Paul Goldberger Advises “Don’t Squeeze Out All the Fresh Air”

Paul Goldberger
Paul Goldberger

“We’re much more sensitive in general to historic buildings than we once were.” How to move forward while preserving the past. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Preserving the Photographic Heritage of the Middle East

Self-portrait by photographer Camille el Kareh, taken in Lebanon in the 1920s

We treasure our family photos because they are reminders of meaningful memories. The same can be said of the photographic collections held by institutions, for they represent who we are and where we have been. When photographs become damaged or… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Accelerated Aging Lab: The Scariest Place at the Getty?

Inside the Accelerated Aging Lab: tools for studying rock and mortar. The machine that looks like an industrial Kitchenaid is, in fact, a Kitchenaid—it’s used for mixing lime putty and mortars.

For those of us over 21, the idea of premature aging is definitely not attractive. Every time I pass the Getty Conservation Institute’s Accelerated Aging Lab, I get somewhat apprehensive. But the lab is not intent on hastening wrinkles and… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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