Pacific Standard Time

Posted in Getty Foundation, People & Places, technology

Eight Reasons to Look Forward to Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA

Marie Orensanz, Limitada, 1978, Photograph, edition 1 of 5, 13 3/4 x 19 11/16 in. (35 x 50 cm), Courtesy of the artist.
© Marie Orensanz

A peek at what’s in store in 2017. More»

Also tagged , , , , : | Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Miscellaneous

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.
Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.

Thousands of historic negatives from La Raza magazine are being digitized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. More»

Also tagged , , , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

LA/LA: Place and Practice

The Political Equator / from a presentation by Teddy Cruz
Courtesy of Teddy Cruz

“We have no reason for coming together other than to be woven together.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Foundation

Art Historians Share Progress on Exhibitions for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA

Discussion panel during the Pacific Standard Time workshop at the Getty Center, October 2014
Discussion panel during the Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA workshop

Work is in full swing on dozens of Pacific Standard Time exhibitions slated for 2017. More»

Also tagged , , : | 1 Response
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Scholarship

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Begins Today

Caixa de fazer amor / Teresinha Soares
Photo: Miguel Aun. Courtesy of Teresinha Soares

A major new initiative to study and celebrate Latin American and Latino art. More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives

Architecture as Art in Culver City

BeehiveHoriz

“Public art can contribute to defining a city’s identity and to unifying its vision,” and buildings contribute to this identity too! More»

Also tagged : | 1 Response
Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Scholarship

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Editor's Picks, Getty Research Institute, technology

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

Also tagged , , , , : | 3 Responses
Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Subterranean L.A.: The Urban Oil Fields

Union 76 Refinery / Connell
Union 76 Refinery at Night, about 1950, Will Connell. Gelatin silver print, 18 1/4 x 23 1/4 x 1/4 in. Lent by Stephen White, Collection II. Artwork © Will Connell

Since the 1890s, Los Angeles has literally and figuratively been built upon acres of ancient oil deposits deep beneath its shifting surface. More»

Also tagged , , , : | 6 Responses
Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

Unearthing ‘70s Architecture in L.A.

Cesar Pelli's Pacific Design Center
Kent Kanouse on Flickr, CC BY-NC 2.0

The 1970s are the “missing years” of L.A.’s architectural history. A reappraisal. More»

Also tagged , , : | Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

  • Flickr