Paintings

Posted in Art, Paintings

A Pop Soundtrack to the Getty Collection, Vol. 1

Why Hasn't He Called
Young Italian Woman at a Table, about 1895–1900, Paul Cézanne. Oil on canvas. 36 1/4 x 28 15/16 inches. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Music shows off the collection in a new light. More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

Portrait of the Artist’s Mother as an Old Woman

Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871, James Abbott McNeill Whistler. Oil on canvas. Paris, Musée d’Orsay © Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY
Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871, James Abbott McNeill Whistler. Oil on canvas. Paris, Musée d’Orsay © Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY

Who is Whistler’s mother? More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Power in a Mummy Portrait

Mummy Portrait of Isidora / Isidora Master
Mummy Portrait of a Woman (detail), about A.D. 100–110, attributed to the Isidora Master. Linen, pigment, and gold; encaustic on wood, 18 7/8 x 14 3/16. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 81.AP.42

This woman is still beautiful and self-assured, 2,000 years after her portrait was painted. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Actor Peter Weller Discusses Renaissance Florence (and Answers Your Questions!)

Peter Weller in Padua
Actor Peter Weller in Padua, Italy

Actor and director Peter Weller is known for his many film and television roles, most famously Robocop in Paul Verhoeven’s campy classic. However, Weller’s interests go far beyond the camera—he is a scholar of Italian Renaissance art who is completing… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Brush and Shutter: When Chinese Painters Became Photographers

Portrait of Li Hongzhang in Tianjin, 1878, Liang Shitai (also known as See Tay) (Chinese, active in Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Tianjin, 1870s–1880s), albumen silver print. The Getty Research Institute, 2006.R.1.4
Portrait of Li Hongzhang in Tianjin / Liang Shitai (also known as See Tay)

The new exhibition Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China uses photographs, along with a few paintings and other artistic media, to tell a largely unknown story about China. In the second half of the 19th century, when China was… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Curator Undercover at the Museum Info Desk

Hans Hoffmann's A Hare in the Forest is curved because its wooden support has warped with time.

As the Getty Museum’s senior curator of paintings, I feel it is incumbent on me to walk through the galleries almost every day, speaking with the security officers and other staff and watching how the public looks at the collections…. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Naked or Nude? Gérôme’s Provocative Bodies

snake_charmer

During a tour of the new exhibition The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme, curator Mary Morton stopped in front of Gérôme’s Snake Charmer and asked the audience, “What do you see?” Murmurs spread through the crowd. One brave little girl… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Circles—Better than Bowling

The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York
The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York

On a recent Saturday night, nearly 20 visitors tried to make sense of a huge, mysterious painting in the Getty Center’s Flemish gallery. Mysterious, because our leader, Lilit Sadoyan, had covered up the painting’s accompanying wall text. We were forced… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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