About: David Brafman

I've been the rare books curator at the Getty Research Institute since 2002. Before decamping from N.Y. to L.A., I was an adjunct professor in the NYU Classics Department and resident-expert at H.P. Kraus, Rare Books and Manuscripts, one of the world's leading dealers in rare books and manuscripts from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. I came to that circuitous career path by getting a Ph.D. in classics and Arabic from Duke University (and the irresistible urge to head straight back to N.Y. the second I finished my doctorate).

Posts by David

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

16th-Century Album Records Social Network of Europeans in Istanbul

Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24
Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24

Newly acquired “book of friends” provides insight into European contact with the Ottoman Empire. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

Graffiti Black Book | Getty Voices

LALiberAmicorum_earlymeeting
One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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      Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.

      This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

      "Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

      Wise man.

      Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/30/14

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