Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Be a Part of “Fuzzy Grids II”

Architects turn the Getty Center into an all-ages, logic-defying playlab this Saturday. Here’s what “Fuzzy Grids II” is, and how to be a part of it

Fuzzy Grids II / Predock_Frane, architects

This Saturday the Getty Center plaza—that vast expanse of travertine that greets you when the tram arrives at the top of the hill—becomes the scene for a unique artwork called Fuzzy Grids II.

The creation of Predock_Frane Architects with sound by Chris Rountree, Fuzzy Grids II plays with the creative tension between the timeless, grid-dominated architecture of the Getty Center and its “feral” counterpart, the colorful Central Garden. Visitors move cubes according to facilitator instructions, creating 3D color-field compositions that are photographed in time-lapse from above.

Clear now? Let me describe it another way. Fuzzy Grids II is:

  • An ephemeral artwork created by passers-by set on a travertine canvas.
  • A fuzzy color-field composition made of 256 giant cube blocks.
  • A giant artistic game board that is fun for kids and adults alike.
  • Gridded logic + loose temporality, with an idiosyncratic soundtrack.
  • Robert Irwin and Richard Meier shaking hands, maybe even getting intimate.
  • A merging: the stationary with the mobile; monochrome with polychrome; a temporary meeting of two worlds.

Curious? Come be part of this one-time-only opportunity to build a gigantic living, almost-breathing artwork on the Getty Center’s plaza: Saturday, July 19, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. (with a short lunch break from 12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.). Check out the hashtag #fuzzygrids to see it in progress.

Behind the scenes with the creation of Fuzzy Grids II

Behind the scenes as the building blocks of Fuzzy Grids II are created. Note the “fuzzies” applied to the blocks at top left.

 

Tagged , , , , , Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

  • Flickr