Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Be a Part of “Fuzzy Grids II”

Architects turn the Getty Center into an all-ages, logic-defying playlab for a participatory installation known as “Fuzzy Grids II”

A family builds Fuzzy Grids II at the Getty Center

Building “Fuzzy Grids II” at the Getty Center

On July 19 the Getty Center plaza—that vast expanse of travertine that greets you when the tram arrives at the top of the hill—is the scene for a unique artwork called Fuzzy Grids II.

The creation of Predock_Frane Architects with sound by Chris Rountree, Fuzzy Grids II plays with the creative tension between the timeless, grid-dominated architecture of the Getty Center and its “feral” counterpart, the colorful Central Garden. Visitors move cubes according to facilitator instructions, creating 3D color-field compositions that are photographed in time-lapse from above.

Clear now? Let me describe it another way. Fuzzy Grids II is:

  • An ephemeral artwork created by passers-by set on a travertine canvas.
  • A fuzzy color-field composition made of 256 giant cube blocks.
  • A giant artistic game board that is fun for kids and adults alike.
  • Gridded logic + loose temporality, with an idiosyncratic soundtrack.
  • Robert Irwin and Richard Meier shaking hands, maybe even getting intimate.
  • A merging: the stationary with the mobile; monochrome with polychrome; a temporary meeting of two worlds.

Curious? Come be part of this one-time-only opportunity to build a gigantic living, almost-breathing artwork on the Getty Center’s plaza: Saturday, July 19, between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

Towers of boxes at Fuzzy Grids II at the Getty Center

Behind the scenes with the creation of Fuzzy Grids II

Behind the scenes as the building blocks of Fuzzy Grids II are created. Note the “fuzzies” applied to the blocks at top left.

Fuzzy Grids II / Predock_Frane, architects

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

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      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

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