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Posted in Education, Getty Center, Getty Villa, Getty360

Summer Family Fun at the Getty

Family enjoying Garden Concerts for Kids at the Getty
Family enjoying Garden Concerts for Kids

Free summer activities for kids and parents at the Getty Center and Getty Villa More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, Getty360

Classicist Edith Hall on Ancient Conflict Resolution, Robots, and Why Knowing Greek History Would Make the World a Better Place

© Michael Wharley Photography 2013

“I would like to teach every young person some bits of Homer, Greek drama, Plato, Aristotle, Livy and Tacitus. The world would be a better place.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Re-Imagined Getty, Drenched in Color

Video still
Video still

A video inspired by photographic history and 20th-century art. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

Gregory Markopoulos’s Film “Galaxie” Screens at the Getty

Still of Jasper Johns from Galaxie, Gregory R. Markopoulos
Still of Jasper Johns from Galaxie, Gregory R. Markopoulos (1966, 16mm)

Free screening of a landmark film from the famously elusive director. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

How to Host a Game Like a Pro

Make every game fun

How to play fun and fair. More»

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Posted in Getty360

Introducing Getty360

Getty360

Find exhibitions and events at a glance with Getty360, launched today. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Research

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at the Getty Research Institute to Focus on Architecture and Design

Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Getty Research Institute

Join us to build a better history of L.A. art through Wikipedia. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Bombing the Cathedral of Reims

German propaganda about the Rheims cathedral bombing
German propaganda card from 1917. The text reads, "The French use the cathedral of Reims as a base of operations and therewith endanger this magnificent work of art" ("Die Franzosen benutzen die Kathedrale von Reims also Operations-Baßis und gefährden damit das herrliche Kunstwerk"). via reims.fr

The battle that launched the culture clash of World War I. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Experimental Music Built on Provocative Films

Body/Head
Photo: Adela Loconte

Body/Head combines improvised music with films that explore deep sexual and psychological themes. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Darkly Humorous Czech Films about the Craziness of Politics

Poster for the film The Joke, 1968
Poster for The Joke (Žert), 1968

“What’s so bracing about Czech New Wave films is how honest and artful they are.” More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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