Behind the Scenes

In Rehearsal with Inara George and Van Dyke Parks

Saturday Nights at the Getty enjoys performing from aerial silk. It’s mostly a concert series, but it often features film, dance, poetry, or some improbably awesome musical mashup, like Irish mariachi or hip-hop violin. Earlier this season Inara George and Van Dyke Parks made an appearance with a 14-piece orchestra and dancers suspended from silk ribbons. Here’s a glimpse at how they put things together for the show.

Look for our next Saturday Night at the Getty on March 31, featuring Abigail Washburn.

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      #ThyCaptionBe: You Look Like Hell

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Escaping the in-laws or medieval Sea World? It’s actually an extreme punishment for a dress code violation. 

      Here’s the full story:

      The Christian tale of Saint Josaphat is roughly based on the life of the Buddha in a kind of medieval game of telephone, in which the sources for the text passed through Christian circles in the Middle East in the 8th century before appearing in European versions in the 11th century. 

      Here an unsuitably dressed guest—we can see that his tattered clothing and scruffy facial hair have no place at the well-dressed gathering—is cast into the dark, open mouth of a terrifying animal. 

      To make matters worse, the story is a parable in which Barlaam, Josaphat’s Christian teacher, describes the sinful who do not make the cut at the Last Judgment.

      Holiday Lesson: Always check the dress code.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.


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