exhibition design

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Explore Renaissance Italy from Your Laptop

NITVirtual1

New online exhibition features 100 beautiful Renaissance illuminations from northern Italy. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Designing Heaven And Earth

Galleries of Heaven and Earth at the Getty Villa
Icons glow against "Raspberry Truffle" walls.

Behind the scenes with the design of an exhibition of Byzantine treasures. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Designing Canterbury and St. Albans

The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.
The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.

Perfectly angled lecterns and a massive glass wall presented plenty of creative challenges for the designers of the exhibition “Canterbury and St. Albans.” More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Architecture and Design, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Ancient Sicilian Coins: Miniature Masterpieces, Full-Scale Challenges

Coin with Nike Driving a Four-Horse Chariot
Royal Library of Belgium—Coin Cabinet

The designer of the Sicily exhibition at the Getty Villa reveals the challenges of displaying small, double-sided, intricate objects—coins. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking Closely

Using augmented reality on an iPad in The Life of Art at the Getty Museum

As the designer of The Life of Art, my job was to get you to look—really look. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Church Pews and iPads? Designing “Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance”

Installation view of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance showing pews and iPads
Installation view of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance showing the design treatment for a gateway object, Giotto's Peruzzi Altarpiece from about 1309–15. (North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, GL.60.17.7). At left, The Virgin Mary with Saints Thomas Aquinas and Paul, about 1330, Bernardo Daddi. The J. Paul Getty Museum. At right, the Carmina regia manuscript, about 1335–40, Pacino di Bonaguida. The British Library

When we first started planning for the design of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance in the fall of 2011, we faced a major challenge: how to deliver the wealth of information we wanted to convey about the artworks…. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Sleeping with Aphrodite

Relief with a Man and a Siren / Roman

One of the most enjoyable aspects of curating an exhibition is serendipity. Not to say these projects aren’t carefully planned (far from it), but sometimes the physical relationship of two artworks will coincide in an unexpectedly fortuitous way, or a… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

See the Decorative Arts from a New Angle

dec_arts

Do artworks have an inner life? You might think so when you visit a new exhibition opening today at the Getty Center. The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display presents the life stories of four objects made to serve… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Creating a Canvas for “Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents”

Gallery view of Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents at the Getty Center

As you move through Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A.: Painting and Sculpture, closing this Sunday, the colors of the walls or the unusual angles of the wall panels might not be the first thing you notice. But Museum designers… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Davina Wolter, Designer

Davina Wolter, setting up The Belles Heures of the Duke of Berry exhibition.

What do you do at the Getty? I’m a designer. My work includes graphics, or 2-D design, as well as 3-D design-such as furniture, interiors, and architectural drawing. Our department, Design, is unique for a cultural institution because we create… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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