history

Posted in Art, Scholarship

Global Pathways through Medieval Manuscripts and the Modern Museum

Global inspiration from the Getty permanent collection.
Global inspiration from the Getty permanent collection.

Contextualizing early book arts in world history. More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Royal Cavities: The Bitter Implications of Sugar Consumption in Early Modern Europe

Dentist / Jan van der Bruggen
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The sweet tooth of European royalty and its rotten consequences. More»

Also tagged , 1 Response
Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, Getty360

What Does the Acropolis Mean? A Conversation with Thomas Gallant

The Parthenon / Edward Dodwell
The Packard Humanities Institute

The Athenian monument as structure and symbol. More»

Also tagged , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

“A Great Passion for Old Stones and Walls”

erechtheion

Snapshots of Greece’s ancient monuments from an era before photography. More»

Also tagged , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

No Pain, No Rogaine: Hair Loss and Hairstyle in Ancient Rome

Bust of a Flavian Woman / Roman
Bust of a Flavian Woman, Roman, late 1st century. Marble, 26 ¾ in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 73.AA.13

Hairy adventures of the ancient Romans. More»

Also tagged , , , 3 Responses
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

Also tagged , , 1 Response
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty360

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Amphorae excavated at Lattes, France
Photo: Michael Dietler

How did wine first come to France? More»

Also tagged , 1 Response
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

Also tagged , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Experience Death Salon Getty Villa

Caitlin Doughty and Judy Melinek at Death Salon Getty Villa

Audio, photos, and social media highlights from Death Salon Getty Villa. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

Which Hero Would You Choose for Your Coffin?

Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles / Roman
Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles, A.D. 180–220, Roman. Marble. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 95.AA.80

Three great heroes with equally great flaws. More»

Also tagged , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

  • Flickr