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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty360

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Amphorae excavated at Lattes, France
Photo: Michael Dietler

How did wine first come to France? More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Experience Death Salon Getty Villa

Caitlin Doughty and Judy Melinek at Death Salon Getty Villa

Audio, photos, and social media highlights from Death Salon Getty Villa. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

Which Hero Would You Choose for Your Coffin?

Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles / Roman
Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles, A.D. 180–220, Roman. Marble. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 95.AA.80

Three great heroes with equally great flaws. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Participate in StoryCorps at the Getty

StoryCorps interview featuring two African American men
Photo: Rob Lowell, courtesy of StoryCorps

Take part in an oral history project this March. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation

Join Three Color Experts for a Twitter Chat about Red

#SeeingRedChat

Save the date for a Twitter chat with three experts on the art and science of red. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Bombing the Cathedral of Reims

German propaganda about the Rheims cathedral bombing
German propaganda card from 1917. The text reads, "The French use the cathedral of Reims as a base of operations and therewith endanger this magnificent work of art" ("Die Franzosen benutzen die Kathedrale von Reims also Operations-Baßis und gefährden damit das herrliche Kunstwerk"). via reims.fr

The battle that launched the culture clash of World War I. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Are We Living in a Barrier-Industrial Complex?

Gilo #1 / Miki Kratsman
Courtesy of and © Miki Kratsman

The art and politics of border walls. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Heinrich Geissler’s Groundbreaking Archive

Black and white photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow
Study photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow

A newly catalogued archive sheds light on how art history was written in Germany after the war. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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