illuminated manuscripts

Posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Hero’s Journey and the Dance of Dragons

Alexander the Great Under Water
Alexander the Great Under Water (detail), about 1400–10, unknown artist, in the World Chronicle. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 33, fol. 220v

Over-the-top tales of Alexander the Great from the pages of medieval manuscripts. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Sun King Illuminated: An Emblem Book for Louis XIV

Escutcheon with a Landscape / Jacques Bailly
Escutcheon with a Landscape (detail) from Emblems for Louis XIV, text in French and Latin by Charles Perrault, illuminations by Jacques Bailly, about 1663–68. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 11, leaf 5

Sleuthing the symbols of Louis XIV in the Getty Center galleries. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Manuscripts Alive: Middle French

Zrinka Stahuljak in the Manuscripts Study Room at the J. Paul Getty Museum
With the Romance of Gillion de Trazegnies in the Manuscripts Study Room

A chivalrous soap opera, read aloud. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Volvelle Animation

It’s part timepiece, part floppy disk, and part crystal ball. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Journey to Marquette

Marquette 2

A curator’s visit to see the French town that one of our precious manuscripts was made in. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Rise and Fall of a Court Artist in Renaissance Italy

Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso
Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso

The unusual life tale of Renaissance illuminator Belbello da Pavia More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Parallel Exhibitions on Renaissance Courts

Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan
Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)
Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)

Los Angeles and Milan host parallel exhibitions of illuminated manuscripts. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Deathly Meditations in Medieval Manuscripts

The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v
The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v

Death is coming. Prepare with these images from illuminated manuscripts. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Grad Intern Diary: Rheagan Martin

Rheagan Martin / Graduate Intern

A year of manuscripts, coins, and English weather. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Manuscript Collector’s Perspective

What draws an art collector to focus on Renaissance manuscripts? More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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