scholarship

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Scholarship

Thirty-Eight Scholars Will Visit the Getty to Study the Materials of Art and the History of Classical Egypt

Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver
2014–15 scholars Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver in conversation at the Getty Research Institute

Thirty-eight scholars will pursue research at the Getty for coming scholar year. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Scholarship

A Quest to Uncover History Through Handwriting

Combat with Swords (detail), from Fiore dei Liberi, Fior di Battaglia, possibly Venice or Padua, ca. 1410. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, 11 x 8 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 20v
Combat with Swords (detail), from Fiore dei Liberi, Fior di Battaglia, possibly Venice or Padua, ca. 1410. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, 11 x 8 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 20v

The study of old handwriting combines detective work, scholarship, and a little bit of magic. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Unlocking Archives through Digital Tech

Decourcy McIntosh, Thomas Gaehtgens, and Gail Feigenbaum
In the Special Collections Reading Room, workshop participants look inside an art dealer's photograph album. Foreground, left to right: independent scholar Decourcy McIntosh, Research Institute director Thomas Gaehtgens, and associate director Gail Feigenbaum.

The vast archives of the Getty Research Institute contain many stories yet untold. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Connecting Seas: The Getty Research Institute in Manila

Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez
Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez

“For all of us, the trip was revelatory on many levels.” More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Digital Success, Interactive Reading, and Other Open Questions about OSCI and Digital Publishing

catalogues2

How do we measure success in digital publishing? What’s better, an app or responsive design? What do we mean by “reading” now? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books, Scholarship, Voices

Creating “Getty Scholars’ Workspace”: Lessons from the Digital Humanities Trenches

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Getty Scholars’ Workspace, an online collaborative working environment, is taking shape at the Getty Research Institute. Lessons from the pilot project. More»

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Posted in Art, Publications, Scholarship, Voices

It’s Time to Rethink and Expand Art History for the Digital Age

Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"
But is it art history? Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"

We need a 21st-century rethink of art history, one that takes us beyond academia to include artistic creation and the reception of artworks by the public. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

It Takes a Village: Understanding Spanish American Colonial Art from the Ground Up

Serie Reyes y Profetas de Israe / Marcos Zapata

Art history is sometimes imagined as a discipline of solitary scholars, not unlike King Solomon as depicted in this Viceregal painting by Marcos Zapata: alone in a study, poring over texts, and waiting for the moment of inspiration (perhaps divine?)… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Research Institute Launches New Search Interfaces for Library Catalog and Photo Study Collection

Research Library Catalog - screenshot of new interface launched February 2012

We’ve just made it easier to find research resources in the collection of the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute, one of the world’s largest art libraries. Last week, we launched a restyled and updated interface for the online… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Creating an Online Collaboration Tool for Scholars

Digital Mellini screenshot

Last month, I gave a presentation with my colleague Tina Shah at the annual Museum Computer Network (MCN) conference in Atlanta about an online collaboration tool for scholars that several of us in the Web group at the Getty have… More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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