special collections

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day,” A Monument of German Romantic Art

Detail of the female figure in Evening from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

This remarkable four-print series depicts the coming and departing of light, which points to the cycles of life from conception to death. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Man of La Belle Ferronière

Image 5_The London Illustrated_July 18 1931_1

A fake Leonardo? The scandalous court case of art dealer Joseph Duveen. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Beatrice Monti della Corte and the Americans

Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail) / Alexander Liberman
Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail), 1962, Alexander Liberman. The Getty Research Institute, 2000.R.19

The glamorous owner of the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan was key to the careers of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, among many others. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith’s Archives and Collections Now at the Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith at Allen Ginsberg's Kitchen Table, New York City, 16 June 1988 / Allen Ginsberg
© Allen Ginsberg LLC

Best known for his experimental films and his anthology of American folk music, Harry Smith was a fascinating multidisciplinary artist and avid collector. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: William Krisel, Southern California’s Architect

William Krisel and Dan Palmer in 1958
William Krisel and Dan Palmer in 1958. Julius Shulman photography archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

The Getty Research Institute is pleased to announce the opening of a new archive relating to mid-century architecture in Southern California: the William Krisel papers. Processed with a grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources, the collection consists… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Buck Teeth and All: True Lies in Early Color Printing

Portrait of Edouard Dagoty, Inventor of Color Printing / Carlo Lasinio

While working on the show The Getty Research Institute: Recent Print Acquisitions (in the GRI Gallery until September 2), I had the pleasure of getting to know one Édouard Gautier-D’Agoty. Every bit the late-18th-century gentleman-artist and rendered in velvety soft… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Needlework Pattern Books

Pattern books from the GRI's collection in a display case, summer 2012

Copies of pattern, model, and sample books for needlework are among the rarest of early modern printed books to survive intact. The reason is simple: virtually all such books were considered “working copies,” and leaves were torn out to be… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Sears: Can an American Institution Return to Its Design Roots?

Design for Drip Coffee Maker / Karl Schneider

Some time ago, I saw a headline in the Wall Street Journal that read “In Retreat, Sears Set to Unload Stores.” It seems that Sears is cash strapped and needs to raise over $700 million, so selling its stores is… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Treasures from the Vault: Luigi Salerno and the Art of Attribution

Natura morta di cucina (Kitchen Still Life) / Cristoforo Munari

The letter pictured here exemplifies the assiduous and learned work of Italian art historian Luigi Salerno (1924–1992), whose archive is now available to researchers. The Luigi Salerno research papers are comprised of research notes, an extensive photographs archive, and correspondence that… More»

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      gettypubs:

      COBALT

      The histories of many colors are amazing, but cobalt may well have the most brilliant of them all. From the Ming Dynasty to Renaissance Italy, cobalt was a popular glaze for porcelain and other ceramics. Cobalt ink is invisible unless exposed to flame, which turns it a vivid green. In the 17th century, this quality made Europeans believe it was witchcraft, but decades later it was used as a neat trick on fire screens. It wasn’t until 1802 that painters added cobalt to their palette. 

      It is this little tidbit from cobalt’s history that saved master forger Han van Meergeren’s skin after WWII, when he was tried for collaborating with the Nazis. Want to find out how some art history sleuthing and smart science got him a not guilty verdict? Hint: Don’t try to forge a Vermeer with cobalt! 

      Read all about it in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Images, clockwise:

      Glazed earthenware dish with a marchant ship, Italy, about 1510. 

      Glazed earthenware tile floor, Spain, about 1425-50.

      Porcelain lidded vase, China, about 1662-1772.

      All objects from the J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      12/18/14

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