war

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Bombing the Cathedral of Reims

German propaganda about the Rheims cathedral bombing
German propaganda card from 1917. The text reads, "The French use the cathedral of Reims as a base of operations and therewith endanger this magnificent work of art" ("Die Franzosen benutzen die Kathedrale von Reims also Operations-Baßis und gefährden damit das herrliche Kunstwerk"). via reims.fr

The battle that launched the culture clash of World War I. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

A Wartime Apocalypse, in Miniature

Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.
Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.

Tiny, feverish watercolors by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner express the anxious hopes of an entire generation of European artists. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Civil War in Pictures

Portrait of a Confederate Soldier/ unknown photographer
Portrait of a Confederate Soldier, about 1862, unknown photographer. Hand-colored ambrotype, 2 9/16 x 2 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XT.818.16

The Civil War captured in early photographs, from young New Yorkers headed to the battlefield to Robert E. Lee one week after the surrender. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

“Not Like a Coward”: Remembering a Warrior’s Death

Gravestone of Pollis / Greek
Gravestone of Pollis, Greek, made in Megara, about 480 B.C. Marble, 60 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 90.AA.129

The intimate association between being remembered and risking one’s life on the battlefield lies at the heart of Homer’s Iliad. The preeminent warrior Achilles famously chose to die young in battle and be forever honored, and this heroic code is well… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Mortals Pay Homage to Homer’s “Iliad,” Epic of Gods and War

A Homeric omen: A Greek wine Cup featuring a scene of an eagle battling a snake, made about 530 B.C.

Mighty sieges and human follies. The bravado of warriors and the rages and schemes of gods. The Iliad, one of the best-told epics of all time, will be heard aloud again when some 150 volunteer readers recite the ancient Greek… More»

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      Presidential Death Beds & Independence Day

      Here’s a little history trivia about this special day

      John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Founding Fathers and the second and third Presidents of the United States, both died on July 4, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of Independence Day. 

      Because of their opposing views on politics as well as their contrasting personalities, the two men were not on friendly terms, and rumor has it that Adams’ last words on his deathbed were “Jefferson survives.” Little did he know that Jefferson had actually died five hours earlier.

      Leaving you with that conversation starter, we hope you celebrate this day with friends and family and feast like the Romans!

      07/04/15

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