war

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

A Wartime Apocalypse, in Miniature

Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.
Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.

Tiny, feverish watercolors by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner express the anxious hopes of an entire generation of European artists. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Civil War in Pictures

Portrait of a Confederate Soldier/ unknown photographer
Portrait of a Confederate Soldier, about 1862, unknown photographer. Hand-colored ambrotype, 2 9/16 x 2 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XT.818.16

The Civil War captured in early photographs, from young New Yorkers headed to the battlefield to Robert E. Lee one week after the surrender. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

“Not Like a Coward”: Remembering a Warrior’s Death

Gravestone of Pollis / Greek
Gravestone of Pollis, Greek, made in Megara, about 480 B.C. Marble, 60 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 90.AA.129

The intimate association between being remembered and risking one’s life on the battlefield lies at the heart of Homer’s Iliad. The preeminent warrior Achilles famously chose to die young in battle and be forever honored, and this heroic code is well… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Mortals Pay Homage to Homer’s “Iliad,” Epic of Gods and War

A Homeric omen: A Greek wine Cup featuring a scene of an eagle battling a snake, made about 530 B.C.

Mighty sieges and human follies. The bravado of warriors and the rages and schemes of gods. The Iliad, one of the best-told epics of all time, will be heard aloud again when some 150 volunteer readers recite the ancient Greek… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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