Architecture and Design, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Exploring 18th-Century Fashion, Garment by Garment

Did you know that artists used pig bladders to carry paint before tubes were invented, that the gold leaf used to gild paintings and manuscripts was made by pounding a coin into thin sheets, or that 18th-century fashion designers used dolls to transmit the latest styles across national borders?

If you’ve ever wondered how the works of art you see at the museum were made, come to an Artist-at-Work Demonstration and get the inside scoop. This demo by costume designer Maxwell Barr explored fashion in the prosperous world of 18th-century Paris and demonstrated the extraordinary craftsmanship and virtuosity of the textiles and designs used to create period clothing garments seen in our recent exhibition Paris: Life and Luxury.

For our next demos, learn watercolor how-to’s with artist Richard Houston every Sunday in September, and watch how pigment and wax come together to make encaustic beginning October 8. The schedule is here.

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One Comment

  1. Amra
    Posted September 12, 2011 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

    “Learning with laughter” … how insightful. Maxwell is a star!

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      #ProvenancePeek: June 30

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This portrait of actress Antonia Zárate by Goya is now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland. The records of famed art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute reveal its recent provenance: the painting was sold by Knoedler on June 30, 1910, to financier Otto Beit. Part of his collection, including this painting, was later donated to the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. To this day the Gallery showcases some of its greatest masterpieces in the Beit Wing. This spread from a digitized Knoedler stock book records the transaction (second entry from top).

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art. He sold European paintings to collectors (such as Henry Clay Frick, the Vanderbilts, and Andrew Mellon) whose collections formed the genesis of great museums such as the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Huntington, and more. Knoedler’s stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Portrait of Doña Antonia Zárate, ca. 1805–06, José de Goya y Lucientes. Beit Collection, National Gallery of Ireland. Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Ireland.

      _______

      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      06/30/15

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