Architecture and Design, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Exploring 18th-Century Fashion, Garment by Garment

Did you know that artists used pig bladders to carry paint before tubes were invented, that the gold leaf used to gild paintings and manuscripts was made by pounding a coin into thin sheets, or that 18th-century fashion designers used dolls to transmit the latest styles across national borders?

If you’ve ever wondered how the works of art you see at the museum were made, come to an Artist-at-Work Demonstration and get the inside scoop. This demo by costume designer Maxwell Barr explored fashion in the prosperous world of 18th-century Paris and demonstrated the extraordinary craftsmanship and virtuosity of the textiles and designs used to create period clothing garments seen in our recent exhibition Paris: Life and Luxury.

For our next demos, learn watercolor how-to’s with artist Richard Houston every Sunday in September, and watch how pigment and wax come together to make encaustic beginning October 8. The schedule is here.

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One Comment

  1. Amra
    Posted September 12, 2011 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

    “Learning with laughter” … how insightful. Maxwell is a star!

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      What unexpected thing have you learned by working at a museum?

      The more time you take with the art, the better. 

      The first time I saw a work by James Turrell, my eyes totally deceived me. I walked into the room (Acton, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art) and saw a gray rectangle “painting,” but I was baffled and could not figure it out—I got closer and closer until my face was pressed against the wall next to it, trying to figure out what it was. When my friend stuck her arm into the painting and revealed the illusion (a square cut into the wall and lit to look flat), my mind was blown! You got me so good, James.

      Also, always offer to take a family photo for the tourists!

      What do you wish you could tell all people about yourself, museums, or life? 

      Everyone is creative.

      Emily, Education Technologist at the Getty, July 24, 2014

      07/29/14

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