design

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Honoring the Legacy of Ladislav Sutnar

Inside the Ladislav Sutnar Faculty of Design and Art
Touring the Ladislav Sutnar Faculty of Design and Art with its dean (center). I am at far right with Steven Heller.

A giant of graphic design is remembered again. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, technology, Voices

Getty Voices: From Paint to Pixels

Four color spheres
In Philipp Otto Runge, Farben-Kugel (Hamburg, 1810), plate opposite p. 15 Hand-colored etchings 85-B14217 Research Library, The Getty Research Institute

How do you transform a 19th-century watercolor into a digital logo? More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Sears: Can an American Institution Return to Its Design Roots?

Design for Drip Coffee Maker / Karl Schneider

Some time ago, I saw a headline in the Wall Street Journal that read “In Retreat, Sears Set to Unload Stores.” It seems that Sears is cash strapped and needs to raise over $700 million, so selling its stores is… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Prints and Drawings

The Oakes Brothers’ Final Week at the Getty

Trevor Oakes completes the final panels of his drawing of the Getty’s Central Garden

Ryan and Trevor Oakes are close to completing their three-week drawing project, in which they’ve been rendering the Getty Center and Central Garden exactly as the human eye views it. Their last day here is this Saturday, December 24. Their… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center, People & Places, Prints and Drawings

Double Draw: The Oakes Brothers at the Getty

The Oakes Brothers sketch in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

Twin brothers and artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes have similar interests, which isn’t really unusual for twins. However, the brothers have taken their mutual fascination with vision, light, space, and depth to a whole new level, and have built their… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Exploring 18th-Century Fashion, Garment by Garment

garment_by_garment

Did you know that artists used pig bladders to carry paint before tubes were invented, that the gold leaf used to gild paintings and manuscripts was made by pounding a coin into thin sheets, or that 18th-century fashion designers used… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Serving Up Zero-Calorie Desserts In Our New Online Store

Dessert Plates featuring the photographs of Jo Ann Callis

Zero-calorie doughnuts and tarts while supplies last at the Museum Store! Get ‘em while they’re hot! Much like other calorie-free foods, these desserts aren’t edible. They’re photographs by Jo Ann Callis imprinted on dessert plates. Callis’s photographs elevate decadent desserts to… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives, Paintings

Name Those Irises (and Win a Book from Getty Publications)

Eyes (detail) - can you guess the artist?

When we set out to design this blog, we looked at irises—lots of them. We asked curators and members of the blog team to pick favorite irises, both literal and metaphorical. There were camera irises, like those in the cache… More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, technology

An Update on the Earthquake in Chile

Earthquake damage at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Talca, Chile. Photo: Jorge Sacaan Riadi
Earthquake damage at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Talca, Chile. Photo: Jorge Sacaan Riadi

The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) is a tool for cataloging and retrieving art information. It is being translated into several languages. Our friend and colleague Lina Nagel (manager of the AAT Spanish translation project) at the Centro de… More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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