Bibliothèque nationale de France

Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Laying Louis XIV to Rest

Representation of the Place Where the Body of Louis XIV, King of France, Was Laid Out in the Church of Saint-Denis
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Qb-1 (1715). Photo credit: BnF

Why are there so few images of Louis XIV’s death? More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Six Meditations on Versailles

Bird's-Eye View of the Castle of Versailles, Its Gardens and Surroundings, as Seen from the Orangerie / Antoine Coquart
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Va-422-format 4. Photo credit: BnF

A 1712 print depicts the palace of Versailles as capital of politics and pleasure. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV, the Original King of Viral Media

Louis le Grand / Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud
Louis le Grand 1714–1715, Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2011.PR.13

The original tech-savvy celebrity. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Conserving the Berthouville Treasure

Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure
Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure. Plate XV in Ernest Babelon, Le trésor d'argenterie de Berthouville près Bernay (Eure) (Paris, 1916). The Getty Research Institute, 2908-151

Conservation treatment represents an important moment in the life of an object, and this is particularly true for the Berthouville Treasure, an extraordinary group of Gallo-Roman silver that arrived at the Getty Villa two years ago. In collaboration with the… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Shark Attack!

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This dynamic painting of a 1749 shark attack in Havana, Cuba, by John Singleton Copley was too good to paint only once. The original hangs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A second full-sized version of the painting, which Copley created for himself, was inherited by his son and eventually gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

      The third version (shown here) is slightly reduced in size, with a more vertical composition. It resides in the Detroit Institute of Arts.

      A quick peek into the digitized stock and sales books of art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute shows the sale of Copley’s masterpiece. It was entered under stock number A3531 in July 1946 and noted as being sold to the Gallery by Robert Lebel, a French writer and art expert. The Knoedler clerk also carefully records the dimensions of the painting—30 ¼ x 36 inches, unframed.

      On the right side of the sales page you’ll find the purchaser listed as none other than the Detroit Institute of Arts. The corresponding sales book page gives the address: Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich., still the location of the museum.

      Watson and the Shark, 1782, John Singleton Copley. Detroit Institute of Arts

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      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      02/10/16

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