French art

Posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Conservation Up Close: Maillol’s “Torso of Dina”

Graduate intern Kellie Boss shines an examination light on Aristide Maillol's Torse de Dina
Grad intern Kellie Boss shines an examination light on Aristide Maillol's Torse de Dina

Museum conservators solve a mystery during the routine treatment of an outdoor sculpture More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, Editor's Picks, Paintings

The Color that Changed the Course of Art

Happy Lovers / Fragonard
Happy Lovers, 1760-65, Jean-Honoré Fragonard. Oil on canvas, 35 1/2 x 47 3/4 in. The Norton Simon Foundation, F.1965.1.021.P. © The Norton Simon Foundation

Prussian blue changed it all. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, technology

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Glimpse into the Sun King’s Private World

Ivory writing table (detail)
Detail showing the ivory and painted horn

An unusual table once owned by Louis XIV offers a peek into a king’s private world. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Center, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Mirror Selfies and Art History

Selfie by Philippe Halbert
Art historian selfie ft. the author

Neoclassical selfies? Check. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Marie-Antoinette’s Swiveling Armchair Is the New Centerpiece of Neoclassical Furniture Gallery

Neoclassical furniture gallery at the Getty Center
Marie-Antoinette's chair (at right) in the newly reinstalled Gallery S114

Marie-Antoinette’s armchair gets the royal treatment. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, technology

This Just In: Édouard Manet’s “Spring”

Jeanne (Spring) / Manet
Jeanne (Spring), 1881, Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 ¼ in. The J. Paul Getty Museum

For Manet, fashion and the femininity were metaphors for the skilled artifice of painting itself. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Miscellaneous

What Do Paleographers Do?

paleography_featured

It’s nothing to do with fossils—paleographers are specialists in old handwriting. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

What Time Is It? In the Collection, It’s Always 10:10

Wall Clock / Andre-Charles Boulle
Wall Clock, about 1710, attributed to André-Charles Boulle. Gilt bronze veneered with blue painted horn and brass; enameled metal; glass. 2 ft. 4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 73.DB.74

For the clocks in the Getty Museum’s collection, time stands eternally still. More»

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      Messages on a Bottle

      Around the body in a very swirly script it reads “Pan e vin e va cantando” or “Bread and wine and merriment.” 

      On the bottom of the bottle an inscription adds, “kan’t Brood en […] Wijn niet doen? Wat Zouts kan’t Mael vergoên” or “If bread and wine fail to do so, a little pinch of salt can save a meal.”

      Calligraphy was a common hobby of the wealthy in the northern Netherlands in the mid-1600s. This bottle’s designer, Willem Jacobsz van Heemskerk, signed his name in more fancy lettering.

      05/03/16

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