Germany

Posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications, Research

New Online Resource to Reveal Stories about Nazi-Looted Art, Wartime Art Market

Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point, ca. 1945–49, Johannes Felbermeyer. This was one of several sites used by the Allies to identify, photograph, and restitute Nazi-seized artworks after the war. Photo Study Collection. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Featuring over 2,000 newly digitized catalogs, a new database will revolutionize Nazi-era art research. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Field Report from the Art History Olympics, the 33rd CIHA Congress

Program book and Anne Helmreich's attendee badge from the 2012 CIHA conference

Art history, like most other professions, relies on acronyms. CIHA refers to the International Committee for the History of Art, which is one of the oldest organizations in the profession, founded in 1930. I recently attended CIHA’s 33rd Congress in… More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Lyonel Feininger’s Photographic Vision

Moholy's Studio Window around 10 p.m. / Lyonel Feininger

In the 1920s, Lyonel Feininger was one of Germany’s best-known artists. He painted, drew, and made prints; he sketched caricatures and composed music; he even created a miniature city that would presage stop-motion animation. But in 1928, at age 58,… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The First Modern Catalogue of an Art Collection: Q&A with Curator Louis Marchesano

View of a Room at Pommersfelden Palace / Johann Georg Pintz

In the 1700s, the seeds of a new style of presenting works of art—both on the wall and on the page—were planted by a German prince. I talked with Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

A Gallery Fit for a Prince and Now the Public? The Düsseldorf Gallery and the Modern Museum

View of a Room at Pommersfelden Palace. Johann Georg Pintz, printmaker; Salomon Kleiner, draftsman; in Representation au naturel des chateaux... (Augsburg, 1728), pl. 18. The Getty Research Institute,84-B21917

Most museum galleries have certain things in common. For one, the works are spaced a restful distance apart from one another on the wall. For another, they’re typically organized by school or theme. The focus might be, say, on fashion… More»

Also tagged , , , , 5 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Nazarenes: German Artists Illuminating the Spirit of the Age

The Coronation of Charlemagne, Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld, 1840. Brown ink over graphite on paper. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2009.5

In the emerald-green galleries of the exhibition Spirit of an Age: Drawings from the Germanic World, I was drawn to a cluster of quiet drawings that convey beautiful stories: miraculous healings, heroic quests of medieval knights, momentous coronations. These are… More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Angela Merkel Visits the Getty

Thomas Gaehtgens, Jim Wood, Antonio Villaraigosa, and Angela Merkel outside the entrance to the Getty Research Institute
Thomas Gaehtgens, Jim Wood, Antonio Villaraigosa, and Angela Merkel outside the entrance to the Getty Research Institute

Thousands of German tourists come to the Getty each year, but today’s visit was special. The Chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel, visited the Getty and was welcomed by L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Getty president and CEO Jim Wood, and the… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      A courtly strut along a winding path. 

      The decorated border reveals perhaps a C, an X, and a Y. It’s difficult to make out, but these initials likely hold the key to the manuscript’s unknown patron.

      #NowOnView in the new rotation of Chivalry in the Middle Ages

      Young Men and Women Outdoors, about 1460 - 1470, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/22/14

  • Flickr