poetry

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Power of Poetry: 6 Questions for Amber Tamblyn

ambertamb

“Poetry has the power to make you feel every human emotion all at once.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Getty Voices: The Poetry of Paper

gm_31887201_detail

Our new drawings exhibition takes an unusual look at negative space, through the lens of poetry. More»

Also tagged , , , , , 7 Responses
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Marilyn Manson, Luminous Poetry, and British Watercolors

Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin
Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin, about 1800. Watercolor over pencil heightened with gum arabic, 14 3/4 x 19 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010.35

I never expected to witness an evening combining British artists Aubrey Beardsley and Thomas Girtin, goth-rocker Marilyn Manson, Ugly Betty, six contemporary American poets, Stonehenge, improvisational bassist Roberto Miranda, William Blake, and the exhumed body of a Pre-Raphaelite model. Yet… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Homer’s “Iliad,” Told in 135 Voices

Karol Wight, Guy Wheatley, Claire Lyons, and Jay Kurtz at the podium for the daylong reading of Homer's Iliad at the Getty Villa

It was an unusual day at the Villa. People wandered about with numbers clipped to their lapels. Intense conversations took place about Homer’s poetry, fueled by coffee and snacks. Visitors moved in and out of the auditorium, as if in… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Writing Verse for “Brush & Shutter”

Diulian at the entrance to the GRI exhibition Brush & Shutter

Greeting you at the entrance to Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China is a duilian, two lines of Chinese poetry that situate the exhibition. The author of that duilian here describes the process of its creation, which was spurred… More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Natalie Merchant on Art, Poetry, and Music

Natalie Merchant. Photo: Mark Seliger
Natalie Merchant. Photo: Mark Seliger

On a rainy afternoon at the Getty Center, two dozen students and teachers anxiously awaited the arrival of Natalie Merchant. Stopping at the Getty on her national tour, the singer-songwriter had invited them to attend a workshop on the theme… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 3 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr