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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Three Drawings from the Dutch Golden Age

A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)
A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)

A peasant portrait, botanical watercolor, and winter scene join the Getty Museum’s collection More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Research

Who Is George Seurat’s “Indian Man”?

An Indian Man / Georges Seurat
Detail of Seurat's An Indian Man showing the finely rendered beard and topknot

Help us solve an art-historical mystery. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Children in Another World: The Photographs of Arthur Tress

Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971. Arthur Tress (American, born 1940). Gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © Arthur Tress.
Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971, Arthur Tress. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.68.13. © Arthur Tress

The inner lives of children take form in the American photographer’s surreal, compelling images. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Laughing Out Loud! Rembrandt Self-Portrait Now on View at the Getty

Close-up of face in Rembrandt Laughing / Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Rembrandt Laughing (detail), about 1628, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. Oil on copper, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.60

A youthful, confident Rembrandt shakes things up in the paintings galleries. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Father-and-Daughter Pastels by William Hoare Now on View

Henry Hoare, "The Magnificent," of Stourhead; Susannah Hoare, Viscountess Dungarvan, later Countess of Ailesbury
L: Henry Hoare, “The Magnificent,” of Stourhead, about 1750–1760, William Hoare. R: Susannah Hoare, Viscountess Dungarvan, later Countess of Ailesbury, about 1750–1760, William Hoare

Newly acquired portraits tell the unusual story of British banking heir Henry Hoare and the artist who depicted him. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Letters by René Magritte Join Research Institute’s Collection

Photo of Rene Magritte painting Les Promenades d'Euclide, 1955
© 2013 C. Herscovici, London / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The artist’s business dealings with gallerist Alexander Iolas are the focus of nine revealing letters from the 1950s and ’60s. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

Graffiti Black Book | Getty Voices

LALiberAmicorum_earlymeeting
One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day,” A Monument of German Romantic Art

Detail of the female figure in Evening from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

This remarkable four-print series depicts the coming and departing of light, which points to the cycles of life from conception to death. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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