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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

This Just In: Édouard Manet’s “Spring”

Spring (Jeanne Demarsy) / Manet
Spring (Jeanne Demarsy), 1881, Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 ¼ in. The J. Paul Getty Museum

For Manet, fashion and the femininity were metaphors for the skilled artifice of painting itself. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

The Radical Artistic Vision of Manet’s “Spring”

Spring as installed at the Getty Museum / Edouard Manet
Spring (Jeanne Demarsy), 1881, Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 ¼ in. The J. Paul Getty Museum

This beautiful painting contains the germ of modern art as we know it. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Anatomy in Wax, Wood, and Ink

“These prints preserve a fascinating moment in the history of art and science, through the meeting point of anatomy.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Just In: The Sublime in the Everyday

Cookie in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland / Chris Killip
"Cookie" in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Chris Killip’s photographs depict hard-working people in a bleak yet visually stunning setting. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Three Drawings from the Dutch Golden Age

A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)
A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)

A peasant portrait, botanical watercolor, and winter scene join the Getty Museum’s collection More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Research

Who Is George Seurat’s “Indian Man”?

An Indian Man / Georges Seurat
Detail of Seurat's An Indian Man showing the finely rendered beard and topknot

Help us solve an art-historical mystery. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Children in Another World: The Photographs of Arthur Tress

Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971. Arthur Tress (American, born 1940). Gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © Arthur Tress.
Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971, Arthur Tress. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.68.13. © Arthur Tress

The inner lives of children take form in the American photographer’s surreal, compelling images. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Laughing Out Loud! Rembrandt Self-Portrait Now on View at the Getty

Close-up of face in Rembrandt Laughing / Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Rembrandt Laughing (detail), about 1628, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. Oil on copper, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.60

A youthful, confident Rembrandt shakes things up in the paintings galleries. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Father-and-Daughter Pastels by William Hoare Now on View

Henry Hoare, "The Magnificent," of Stourhead; Susannah Hoare, Viscountess Dungarvan, later Countess of Ailesbury
L: Henry Hoare, “The Magnificent,” of Stourhead, about 1750–1760, William Hoare. R: Susannah Hoare, Viscountess Dungarvan, later Countess of Ailesbury, about 1750–1760, William Hoare

Newly acquired portraits tell the unusual story of British banking heir Henry Hoare and the artist who depicted him. More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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