About: Anne Helmreich

I'm a senior program officer at the Getty Foundation and an art historian specializing in 19th-century European, particularly British, art. Before coming to the Getty, I was associate professor of art history and director of the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities at Case Western Reserve University. My scholarly work focuses on the history of the art market, the relationships between art and science, and the history of the built environment.

Posts by Anne

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Research

Reimagining the Medieval Mediterranean

Norman Stanza, Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily
Photo: Bill Tronzo

Scholars look anew at the medieval Mediterranean. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

Online Museum Collection Catalogues, Mantra and Metaphor

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What do you want to be, a grocery store or a restaurant? More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications

Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.
The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.

Another online collections catalogue supported by the Getty Foundation has launched More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Research

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New Digital Publication Zooms in on Claude Monet

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New digital catalogue from the Art Institute of Chicago lets you get up close and personal with Monet’s brushstrokes. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications, Research

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications, Voices

OSCI and The Future of Digital Publishing | Getty Voices

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Digital isn’t just revolutionizing publishing. It’s revolutionizing the museum. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Field Report from the Art History Olympics, the 33rd CIHA Congress

Program book and Anne Helmreich's attendee badge from the 2012 CIHA conference

Art history, like most other professions, relies on acronyms. CIHA refers to the International Committee for the History of Art, which is one of the oldest organizations in the profession, founded in 1930. I recently attended CIHA’s 33rd Congress in… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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