Monthly Archives: March 2013

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Beatrice Monti della Corte and the Americans

Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail) / Alexander Liberman
Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail), 1962, Alexander Liberman. The Getty Research Institute, 2000.R.19

The glamorous owner of the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan was key to the careers of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, among many others. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith’s Archives and Collections Now at the Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith at Allen Ginsberg's Kitchen Table, New York City, 16 June 1988 / Allen Ginsberg
© Allen Ginsberg LLC

Best known for his experimental films and his anthology of American folk music, Harry Smith was a fascinating multidisciplinary artist and avid collector. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust, Scholarship

Risk, Collaborate, Tweet: Charting Next Steps in Digital Humanities at the Getty

digital_humanities_future_featured

What should we do to move forward in digital humanities? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking East, Looking West

Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park
Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park

“Looking East” established a platform for international dialogue around art, history, and cultural exchange. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Publications, Scholarship

Which Way, Digital_Humanities?

Provocation from Digital_Humanities
A provocation.

“Ours is an era in which the humanities have the potential to play a vastly expanded creative role in public life.” Will they? More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Voices

Mystery Cults and the Mother Goddess

Orphic Prayer Sheet / Greek
Orphic Prayer Sheet, Greek, 350-300 B.C. Gold, 1 7/16 x 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 75.AM.19. Gift of Lenore Barozzi

Only initiates could take part in the rites of the mystery cult, and they were forbidden to ever speak of what occurred. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Education, Getty Villa, Voices

Getty Voices: Digging the Sacred

Engraved Gem (Snake-legged Creature)
Engraved gem with snake-legged creature, Unknown, Roman, 200 - 400 A.D., The J. Paul Getty Museum.

“I can really appreciate the ancient system where borrowing, amalgamating, and generally mixing it up was perfectly acceptable.” More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

David Goldblatt’s Photographs of South Africa Join the Getty Museum’s Collection

David Goldblatt (South African, born 1930), Young Men with dompas, White City, Jabavu, Soweto, November 1972, Gelatin silver print, 22.9 x 22.9 cm (9 x 9 in.), The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, © David Goldblatt
Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © David Goldblatt

Candid photographs of racially divided neighborhoods and cities during apartheid join the collection. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

First Annual Day of Service Is a Hit

Jim Cuno at the Getty's Day of Service, March 11, 2013

Reflections on the Getty’s first annual Day of Service. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking Closely

Using augmented reality on an iPad in The Life of Art at the Getty Museum

As the designer of The Life of Art, my job was to get you to look—really look. More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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