Florence

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Revisiting a Florentine Master

Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in.  Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311
Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida. Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida. Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in. Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311

New research on Pacino di Bonaguida, a central figure in the rise of the Renaissance in Florence. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Researching the Renaissance

Julian Brooks in Florence with reproductions of Andrea del Sarto's Renaissance drawings
Florence, del Sarto, and I.

“It’s amazing to be immersed in Andrea del Sarto’s home city, his drawings, paintings, frescoes, and his life, normally all so far away when I’m in L.A.” More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

From the Black Death to Black Friday

Saint Eloy in His Goldsmith’s Workshop / Master of the Misericordia
Saint Eloy in His Goldsmith’s Workshop, about 1370, Master of the Misericordia. Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 13 3/4 x 15 3/8 in. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, no. 2841

There’s been a lot of talk about shopping over the past few days, from Black Friday to Cyber Monday (now expanded to Cyber Week). In late medieval Florence, shopping—for art—was also all the rage. In the years leading up to the… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Meet the Artist Who Helped Launch the Renaissance in Florence

The Ascension of Christ from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese / Pacino di Bonaguida

In the early 1300s, 150 years before Leonardo and Michelangelo walked its streets, Florence was a hotbed of artistic production and creativity. Three works in the Getty Museum’s collection produced in the city at this dynamic moment—all by the same… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation

Inside Brunelleschi’s Dome

View of Brunelleschi's dome from the first gallery. Photo courtesy of the project for the photographic documentation of the Cupola of St. Maria del Fiore in Florence
View of Brunelleschi's dome from the first gallery. Photo courtesy of the project for the photographic documentation of the Cupola of St. Maria del Fiore in Florence

Italy is full of extraordinary, breathtaking round-the-corner experiences. You round a corner in Rome and find the Pantheon. In Pisa it could be the Torre Pendente di Pisa, better known as the Leaning Tower. When you arrive at the Florence… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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