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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Welcoming the Berthouville Treasure to the Getty Villa

Mathilde Avisseau-Broustet, Eduardo Sanchez, and Susan Lansing Maish with the Berthouville Treasure

The J. Paul Getty Museum and Cabinet des Médailles of the Bibilotheque nationale de France (the department of coins, medals, and antiques of the National Library of France) are collaborating on the research and conservation treatment of the Berthouville Treasure, an… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Visit to Thomas Demand’s Studio

Thomas Demand in his Culver City studio with visitors from the Getty Research Institute
Thomas Demand in his Culver City studio, showing us the set of his latest work and his paper and cardboard constructions

During my work as a Multicultural Undergraduate Intern at the Getty this summer,  I was invited to join colleagues from the Getty Research Institute on a visit to artist Thomas Demand’s studio in Culver City. It was a memorable look… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, J. Paul Getty Trust

A Landmark Antiquities Agreement with Greece

Pavlos Yeroulanos, James Cuno, and David Bomford at the Getty Villa

This week, several of my colleagues and I had the pleasure of welcoming to the Getty Villa the Minister of Culture and Tourism for the Hellenic Republic, Pavlos Yeroulanos. The purpose of his visit was to join our President and… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

“The Photographer with the Soul of an Architect”: Lucien Hervé

Cover of Le Corbusier & Lucien Herve / Getty Publications

In 1949, self-taught photographer Lucien Hervé (1910–2007) traveled from Paris to Marseille to see Unité d’habitation, a housing complex by architect Le Corbusier. Awed by the groundbreaking modern design, Hervé took 650 photographs of it in a single day. When… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Gardens and Architecture, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chiurazzi Bronzes, from Pompeii to Malibu

Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii
Replica of a Roman bronze sculpture of Apollo as an Archer in the ruins of Pompeii

The two bronze statues at the heart of the current Getty Villa exhibition Apollo from Pompeii: Investigating an Ancient Bronze—set to close September 12—may look rather familiar if you’ve traveled to Pompeii or seen it in pictures. For as you… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Treasures from the Vault: Sam Francis and Mako Idemitsu

Untitled (Mako Series) / Sam Francis
Untitled (Mako Series), 1967, Sam Francis. Oil on canvas. 120 x 95 11/16 in. Collection of The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, museum purchase, The Benjamin J. Tillar Memorial Trust. © 2011 Sam Francis Foundation, California / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Those accustomed to thinking of Sam Francis as a major figure in a local art scene will be surprised to find that he was quite the internationalist, even before it became compulsory for Los Angeles artists to be so. A… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, J. Paul Getty Trust

Reflections on My First Days at the Getty—And What’s Next

Jack Brogan, fabricator, and Rani Singh of the Getty Research Institute inspect De Wain Valentine's Red Concave Circle in Brogan's studio in Inglewood, California, June 17, 2011

The J. Paul Getty Trust is an extraordinary arts institution. That I knew before coming to work at the Getty this week as its president and CEO. What I didn’t know—couldn’t know until I became a full part of this organization—was… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Question of the Week: Do Americans See the World through a Distorted Lens?

Sol and Cuba, Old Havana, Looking North from Alberto Roja's 1951 Plymouth, Havana, Alex Harris, negative, May 23, 1998; print, December 2007. Chromogenic print, 30 1/8 x 37 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010.90.3. Gift of Michael and Jane Wilson, Wilson Centre for Photography © Alex Harris
Sol and Cuba, Old Havana, Looking North from Alberto Roja's 1951 Plymouth, Havana, Alex Harris, negative, May 23, 1998; print, December 2007. Chromogenic print, 30 1/8 x 37 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010.90.3. Gift of Michael and Jane Wilson, Wilson Centre for Photography © Alex Harris

Initially designating himself an “ignorant American,” photographer Alex Harris went to Cuba in 1998, camera in tow, without preconceived notions. He simply wondered what photography could tell him about this neighboring country that he, along with so many other Americans,… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Publications

Painterly Urban Planning: Nikolaus Pevsner’s “Visual Planning and the Picturesque”

Cover of Nikolaus Pevsner's Visual Planning and the Picturesque, published by the Getty Research Institute
 

Nikolaus Pevsner (1902–1983) was one of the 20th century’s foremost historians of British architecture. Even today, tourists wander through the historic squares of England aided by Pevsner’s The Buildings of England guidebooks, which remain in print with Yale University Press… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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