Outdoor Classical Theater

Posted in Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

An Interview with the Creative Team behind Euripides’ “Helen” at the Getty Villa

helen

“It’s a whole lot of fun to roll up to rehearse at the Getty Villa on a daily basis,” says Maxwell Caulfield, the actor headlining the Getty Villa’s outdoor theater production of Euripides’ Helen, presented by Playwrights’ Arena. In this… More»

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A Living Artifact: “Trojan Women (after Euripides)” Premieres Tonight

trojan_women

Tonight at 8:00 p.m., the Getty Villa becomes a stage for the premiere of Trojan Women (after Euripides). It’s the culmination of years of work and refinement, both for SITI Company (presenting the play) and for the team at the… More»

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Nothing Happens, Everything Happens: Perspectives on “Trojan Women (after Euripides)”

trojan_women_2

“People don’t understand why Trojan Women is such a great play, because they say nothing happens,” says director Anne Bogart, explaining why SITI Company chose to adapt the ancient drama for this year’s outdoor theater production at the Getty Villa. “In… More»

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SITI Company on “Trojan Women (after Euripides)” at the Getty Villa

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SITI company premieres a newly commissioned adaptation of Euripides’ Trojan Women at the Getty Villa on September 8. “We’ve been working for 20 years to do this play,” says Leon Ingulsrud, who helped found the New York-based ensemble in 1991. In… More»

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Reimagining Euripides: A 21st-Century “Trojan Women” at the Getty Villa

Playwright and dramaturg Jocelyn Clarke and SITI Company director Anne Bogart
Playwright and dramaturg Jocelyn Clarke and SITI Company director Anne Bogart

First performed over 2,400 years ago, Euripides’ Trojan Women is one of the most enduring and moving of classical dramas—and one of the greatest antiwar plays. Beginning September 8, renowned New York-based theater troupe SITI Company premieres a newly commissioned… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Video: Manoel Felciano on Playing Orestes in “Elektra”

orestes

Sophocles’ Elektra—which concludes its run at the Getty Villa this Saturday—is the story of a woman’s thirst for revenge: Elektra rages and plots against her mother (and her mother’s lover) for slaying her father. But Elektra’s brother, Orestes, is the… More»

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Video: Pamela Reed on Working with Carey Perloff and Olympia Dukakis

pamela_reed

Pamela Reed rips into the role of murderous queen Clytemnestra in Sophocles’ Elektra with gusto. She creates a character that reviewers have described as despicable, divalike, suave, snarky, and imperious—in short, a perfect and delicious villain. In this video, Reed… More»

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Video: Olympia Dukakis and Carey Perloff on the Making of “Elektra”

dukakis_perloff

“I will not participate in that patriarchy!” That was Olympia Dukakis’s reaction, almost 25 years ago, when director Carey Perloff approached her about starring as Clytemnestra in Ezra Pound’s translation of Elektra. Today’s production—with a text by acclaimed female  playwright… More»

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Video: Bonfire Madigan Shive on the Music for “Elektra” at the Getty Villa

Bonfire Madigan Shive

“A living, pulsing world” is what composer, cellist, and vocalist Bonfire Madigan Shive set out to create with her music for the Villa’s outdoor production of Elektra. Though it’s been described as haunting and subtle, the sound is also a… More»

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Video: “Elektra” Director and Cast on Working in the Villa’s Outdoor Theater

elektra

What is it like to perform Greek tragedy in an outdoor theater setting? The director, the composer and musical director, and cast members of the sold-out new production of Sophocles’ Elektra—which premieres tonight at the Getty Villa—gave us their take… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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